Brigham Young University
1065 JFSB • 801-422-2276
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Global Women's Studies Affiliated Faculty

Faculty affiliation is open to all BYU faculty members whose teaching, research, and/or service activities involve global or domestic women’s issues. Global Women’s Studies provides a supportive environment and affiliates have access to a network in which junior and senior affiliated faculty members share, mentor, and, where appropriate, collaborate on research relating to women’s issues.

Faculty Affiliates, by area of study:
(Click on the faculty member's name to be taken to their bio below.)

Advertising/Design

Africana Studies
Leslie Hadfield
(African American History)

Anthropology

Arts (Visual)
Jen Watson

Business/Management

Communications

Comparative Arts & Letters
Julie Allen
(Comparative Arts & Letters)
Heather Belnap
(Art History)
Marlene Esplin
(Comparative Arts & Letters)
Jane Hinckley 
(Comparative Arts & Letters)
Francesca Lawson
(Comparative Arts & Letters)
Martha Peacock
(Art History)
Cecilia Peek 
(Classics & Comparative Studies)

Dietetics/Nutrition/Exercise Sci.

Public Health/Nursing
Brianna Magnusson
(Health Science)
Len Novilla
(Public Health)
Julie Valentine
(Nursing)

Education
Roni Jo Draper
(Teaching Education)

English Lit./Writing/Editing
Aaron Eastley
(English)
Jamie Horrocks 
(British Literature)
Nick Mason
(English)
Kristin Matthews
(English)
Brandie R. Siegfried 
(British Literature)
Delys Waite Snyder
(English)
Michael Taylor
(English)
Jarica Watts
(British Literature)
Paul Westover 
(English)
Lorraine Wood
(English)

Family Life
Sarah Coyne
(School of Family Life)
Erin Holmes
(School of Family Life)
Chelom Leavitt
(School of Family Life)

History
Eric Dursteler
(History)
Amy Harris
(Family History)
Susan Sessions Rugh
(History)
George Ryskamp
(Family History)
Rebecca de Schweinitz
(US Women's History & African American History)
Jeffrey Shumway
(Argentine/ Latin America History)
Evan R. Ward
(History)

Interdisciplinary Hum
Elizabeth Smart
(Humanities, Humanities Librarian)
Charlotte A. Stanford
(Interdisciplinary Humanities)

Intn'l/Global Studies/ Political Science
Natalie Wright Romeri-Lewis                  
(International Development)

(Foreign) Languages & Literature
Christian Ahihou
(French Literature)

Teresa Bell
(German Studies)
Bethany Beyer
(Spanish & Portuguese Literature)
Cindy Brewer 
(German Studies)
Mara García 
(Spanish-American Literature)
Anna-Lisa Halling
(Spanish & Portuguese Literature)

Jennifer Haraguchi
(Italian Literature)
Valerie Hegstrom 
(Spanish Literature)
Robert Hudson 
(French Literature)
Michelle Stott James
(German Studies)
Daryl Lee
(French/International Cinema)
Julie Lefgren
(Chinese Language & Literature)

Christopher Lund 
(Portugese)
Adam McBride
(French Linguistcs)
Rob McFarland
(German Studies)
Rex Nielsen
(Portuguese & Brazilian Studies)

Marie Orton
(Italian)

Anca Sprenger 
(French)

Law School
Kif Augustine-Adams
(Law)

Library Science
Maggie Kopp
(Curator of European Books, Special Collections Associate Department Chair)
Connie Lamb
(Women's Studies Librarian, Social Sciences Librarian)
Elizabeth Smart
(Humanities and Media Associate Librarian)

Museum of Art
Janalee Emmer
(Art History/Art Education)

Music/Dance/Theatre Arts
Marin Leggat Roper
(Dance)
Megan Sanborn Jones 
(Theatre)

Philosophy
Katie Paxman

(Philosophy)

Psychology/Social Work
Wendy Birmingham
(Psychology)
Melissa Goates-Jones
(Psychology, Counseling)
Julianne Holt-Lunstad
(Psychology)
Niwako Yamawaki
(Psychology)

Recreation Management/ Athletics

Religion
Rachel Cope
(LDS Church History & Doctrine)
Amy Easton-Flake
(Ancient Scripture)
Catherine Gines Taylor
(Ancient Scripture)
Janiece Johnson
(Church History)
Mary Jane Woodger
(Church History)

Sociology
Michael Cope
Mikaela Dufur
Renata Forste
Melissa Jones
Hayley Pierce
Kevin Shafer

STEM
Laura Bridgewater
(Micro-Biology)
Jamie Jensen
(Biology)

Lynne Nielsen
(Statistics)

 

Christian Ahihou
Visiting Professor of French Literature
cahihou@ufl.edu (801) 422-3935 |  3134C JFSB 

Christian Ahihou is a Visiting Assistant Professor of French. Part of his research works focus on feminine writing in Francophone Africa and includes his books Ken Bugul – La langue littéraire (Paris: L’Harmatta, 2013) and Glissement et fonctionnements du langage littéraire dans l’écriture du roman chez Ken Bugul (currently under review at Karthala in Paris). He is currently working on an ambitious research project in which he brings forward and analyzes different aspects of women writings in French-speaking Africa: (feminine) writing practices, predominant themes addressed by women writers in their books, and the criticism of women writings. He plans to offer and teach courses related to this Women Studies area of his research agenda.     

Julie Allen
Full-time Professor of Comparative Arts & Letters
julie_allen@byu.edu  | 3025 JFSB

Julie Allen is a Professor of Comparative Arts and Letters at BYU, since August 2016, but before that worked in the Scandinavian Studies department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for ten years. She grew up in Laie, Hawaii and has her PhD in Germanic Languages and Literatures. Most of her research has focused on questions of national and cultural identity, particularly in Denmark and among Danish American immigrants. Her book, Danish but Not Lutheran (University of Utah Press, 2017), looks at the intersection of Danish national and cultural identity development with the advent of religious freedom in 1849 and the arrival of Mormonism in Denmark in 1850.  It also looks at Danish immigrants in Utah who were outside the Anglo-American linguistic and cultural mainstream. Her most recent gender-related project uses oral histories to consider how religion and migration interact in the lives of African women of faith in northern Europe.

Kif Augustine-Adams
Professor of Law and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
adamsk@law.byu.edu (801) 422-3712 | 428 JRCB

Kif Augustine-Adams is the Charles E. Jones Professor of Law and former Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs (January 2008 - July 2013) at the Law School.  She regularly teaches a feminist legal theory course at the law school.  During the 2013-2014 academic year, she was a Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer at Renmin University Law School in Beijing where she also taught feminist legal theory. 

Alyssa Banford Witting, PhD, LMFT
Associate Professor School of Family Life, Marriage and Family Therapy Program
alyssa_banfordwitting@byu.edu | 258 TLRB; 2085 JFSB

As faculty in the marriage and family therapy program, there are components of my work in teaching, and research that relate to women and gender. Conversations about how gender shapes our experience and development as cultural beings are part of the cross-cultural and theory courses I teach.

My research interest broadly encompasses processes and resources which sustain trauma symptoms as well as aid rehabilitation in trauma affected populations. My emphasis of topical interest is in mass trauma events. Specifically, I am interested in the relational, contextual, and socio-cultural issues which influence trauma symptoms and recovery in individuals, families, and communities affected by natural disaster. I have conducted research in Sri Lanka with widowed and the US with disaster and war affected populations. The experience of women in disaster is still understudied and part of my research agenda includes expanding understanding of how gender dynamics affect the experiences of those affected.

Teresa Bell
Associate Professor, German Language Program Director
ACTFL  Program Review Coordinator for CAEP
teresa_bell@byu.edu | (801) 422-4961 |  3102 JFSB

Teresa Bell is an Associate Professor in the Department of German and Russian. She received her PhD in Second Language Acquistion and Teaching from the University of Arizona in 2001. She taught at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Oklahoma prior to coming to BYU. Her research interested focus is on effective language teaching and the effects of gender on language learning.

Recent relevant publications:
Bell, T. R. (2015). Matching student and teacher perceptions for the retention of university German students.  In R. J. Halverson, & C. A. Constabile-Heming (Eds.), Taking stock of German studies in the United States: The new millennium. (pp. 200-225.) Rochester, NY: Camden House.

Heather Belnap
Coordinator of European Studies, Full-time Associate Professor of Art History
heather_belnap@byu.edu  (801) 422-8242 | 3051 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Heather Belnap is an associate professor of art history who specializes in nineteenth-century European art and culture and gender studies. Her research focuses on women in the art world of post-Revolutionary France. She is the co-editor, along with Temma Balducci and Pamela Warner, of Interior Portraiture and Masculine Identity in France, 1789-1914 (Ashgate, 2011), with a contribution on the artist and father-daughter portraiture. Jensen and Balducci are currently working on a pendant to this volume that centers on women, bourgeois femininity, and public spaces in nineteenth-century visual culture. She is also working on a book manuscript tentatively titled Art, Fashion, and the Modern Woman in Post-Revolutionary France.

Bethany Beyer
Visiting Assistant Professor of Portuguese
bethany_beyer@byu.edu (801) 422-7221 | 3168 JFSB

Bethany Beyer, Visiting Assistant Professor of Portuguese, received her B.A. and M.A. in Comparative Literature from BYU, and completed her Ph.D. in Hispanic Languages and Literatures at UCLA (2013). Her research explores race, ethnicity, and gender in the shaping of the "national" families of Brazil and Cuba during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly with regard to adaptations of literature into dramatic musical works. She has presented on or written about texts by authors including Helen Hunt Jackson, Machado de Assis, and Nicolás Guillén. Dr. Beyer's current research focuses on how present-day dramatic adaptations of the nineteenth-century novels Cecilia Valdés and Ramona encourage the reinterpretation of the works’ celebrated homonymous female protagonists; she is also working on a project that examines representations of women and conquest in Brazil in Jorge Amado’s novels.

 

Wendy Birmingham
Assistant Professor of Psychology and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
wendy_birmingham@byu.edu (801) 422-1648 | 1054 SWKT

Professor Birmingham's program of research is guided by previous research indicating that the quality and quantity of one’s social relationships are linked to lower morbidity and mortality and protect against the adverse effect of stress. Her research focuses on two pathways linking relationship quality and quantity to health outcomes: physiological pathways and behavioral pathways. In terms of examining physiological pathways, she is interested in how marital relationship quality and family processes can impact blood pressure, a predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. In terms of examining behavioral pathways, she is interested in how relationship processes such as relationship quality, familial support and influence, spousal support and influence, and patient-provider influence can impact behaviors such as cancer screening adherence (e.g., HPV vaccination adherence, colorectal cancer screening adherence, mammography adherence), and diet and lifestyle choices, specifically in individuals who are at increased risk for cancer due to a family history.  She also teaches the Introduction to Women's Studies course on occasion.

   

Cindy Brewer
Associate Professor of German Studies
Cindy_Brewer@byu.edu   (801) 422-8057 | 3111 JFSB

Cindy Brewer is an Associate Professor of German Literature. Her research interests include Cultural Studies, Gender Studies, Women's Studies, Feminist Theory, and Postcolonial Studies. She works on the Sophie Digital Library of Early German-Language Women's Writing.

Her undergraduate major was European studies with a Hebrew minor. She went on to obtain an MA and PhD in German to become employed as a professor of German literature at BYU.  She has lived in Vienna, Austria, where she directed the Kennedy Center’s Vienna Study Abroad program. She is also delving into researching the writings of Austrian nuns who served missions in Africa.


Laura Bridgewater
Associate Professor of Molecular Biology, 
Associate Academic Vice President for Faculty Development
laura_bridgewater@byu.edu 

Dr. Laura Bridgewater earned her Ph.D. in genetics at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., did a postdoc at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and has been on the faculty at BYU since 1999.  She is a professor in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology and the former associate dean in the College of Life Sciences and former chair of the molecular and microbiology department.  She is the mother of four kids, all born while she was in graduate school.

Dr. Bridgewater studies the gut microbiota and the way it impacts physical and mental health. She has served as the faculty advisor to the student academic group "Women in Science." 

 

Michael Cope
Assistant Professor of Sociology
michaelrcope@byu.edu (801) 422-9265 | 2034 JFSB

Gender Studies Related Publications

Professor Cope's research interests are in the area of community sociology, with an emphasis on understanding the unique challenges faced by rural populations. His scholarship is underpinned with the assumption that communities are dynamic and synergistic; that community can transcend the economic and demographic characteristics of a locality. Consequently, he contends it is just as much of an axiomatic task for community sociologists to understand the diverse ways in which individuals experience community as it is to understand the relationship between individual- and community-level attributes and outcomes. To that end, Michael seeks to use gender and feminist theories and perspectives to understand the lived experiences of rural women.

 

CAMERA SHY

Rachel Cope
Assistant Professor of Church History and Doctrine
rachel_cope@byu.edu (801) 422-3367 | 210J JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Rachel Cope is an Assistant Professor of Church History and Doctrine. She received her PhD in American history, with an emphasis on religious history and women's history, from Syracuse University in 2009. Dr. Cope's research interests include women's spirituality and conversion narratives in eighteenth and nineteenth century America. She teaches Mormon Women's History (WS 332).

Sarah Coyne
Associate Professor in the School of Family Life
smcoyne@byu.edu (801) 422-6949 | 2087 JFSB

Dr. Sarah M. Coyne is an associate professor in the School of Family Life at BYU. She studies how women are portrayed in the media and how viewing such portrayals influences aggression, body image, sexual behavior, and more. Her most recent study involved how viewing Disney Princesses influences behavior in preschool girls. 

Rebecca de Schweinitz
Associate Professor of History and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
rld@byu.edu (801) 422-1594 | 2162 JFSB

Dr. de Schweinitz received her PhD in History from the University of Virginia in 2004 where much of her graduate coursework focused on American women and gender history. After researching and writing about late-nineteenth, early-twentieth-century women’s history she began to think about how to use gender theory in the new field of children’s history. Her research on children and youth in the civil rights movement and on childhood, “family values,” and American slavery draws on her expertise in women and gender history. A new research project examines the movement to lower the voting age to 18 in the United States in a number of different contexts, including the modern feminist movement. She teaches U.S. Women’s History and a research and writing course on race and gender in twentieth century America. She has also mentored a number of student theses and independent research projects on women and gender history.

Roni Jo Draper
Professor of Teaching Education and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
roni_jo_draper @byu.edu (801) 422-4960 | 206Q MCKB

Roni Jo Draper is a professor in the Department of Teacher Education in the David O. McKay School of Education at BYU. She teaches courses in literacy education, multicultural education, and research methods. Most of Dr. Draper’s scholarship in teacher education focuses on preparing teachers to support the literacy development of young people within the disciplines (e.g., mathematics, science, engineering, and the arts). Her focus on teacher education has led her to critique the curricula and pedagogy used to prepare teachers. More recently her critique has included investigating the taken-for-granted notions of gender and sexuality found in teacher education curricula and the potential of those notions to support and/or limit opportunities for young people to thrive in and out of school. In addition to her scholarship and teaching, Dr. Draper is an active ally to the LDS LGBTQ community and serves in the local chapter of PFLAG. 

Mikaela Dufur
Associate Professor of Sociology
mikaela_dufur@byu.edu (801) 422-1720 | 2037 JFSB

Mikaela Dufur is associate professor of Sociology at Brigham Young University. She earned a BA in English from BYU and an MS and PhD in Sociology from Ohio State University. Her main research focus is on how family and school resources help influence child and adolescent academic and social development. Her recent work includes research on whether girls and boys develop social capital in the same ways and receive similar returns to social investment. Within this research stream, she has also published work challenging conventional wisdom about how single-mother families operate and how gender works in single-parent families. She is also interested in sport, particularly in how gender and race are shaped and reified within sport. She is the Stratification Section editor of Sociology Compass.
 

 

Eric Dursteler
History Department Chair, Professor of History
ericd@byu.edu 801-422-5260 | 2129 JFSB

Eric Dursteler joined the History Department of Brigham Young University in 1998, where he is currently serving as the Department Chair.  He earned his PhD from Brown University in 2000.  His research focuses on gender, religious identity and food in the the early modern Mediterranean.  He has received research fellowships from the Fulbright Commission, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, the American Philosophical Society, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, and the Folger Shakespeare and Huntington libraries.  His publications include Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean (2006, Turkish translation 2012), Renegade Women: Gender, Identity and Boundaries in the Early Modern Mediterranean (2011, Turkish translation 2013), and as editor, A Companion to Venetian History, 1400-1797 (2013).  His book, The Mediterranean World, co-authored with Monique O’Connell, was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2016. He is also currently working on a book on food and foodways in the early modern Mediterranean. He is the editor of the News on the Rialto, and book review editor for the Journal of Early Modern History.  He and his wife Whitney have three children and one grandchild.

Aaron Eastley
Associate Professor of English

801-422-1695  |  4119 JFSB
 

Aaron Eastley is an Associate Professor in the English Department. He holds a PhD from the University of California at San Diego, and specializes in transnational literatures in English, British Modernism, planetary modernisms, and diaspora and globalization studies. Women’s issues factor prominently in all of these subfields, and are a frequent component of Professor Eastley’s teaching and research. For instance, he recently taught a graduate seminar on UK Immigrant Literatures, featuring authors such as Zoe Wicomb, Buchi Emecheta, Andrea Levy, and Monica Ali. Recent publications by Professor Eastley have appeared in the Journal of Caribbean LiteraturesTwentieth-Century LiteratureARIEL, and Conradiana, and he has an article on South African/Scottish writer Zoe Wicomb forthcoming in Research in African Literatures.

Amy Easton-Flake
Assistant Professor of Ancient Scripture

801-422-3358  |  210L JSB
 
Amy Easton-Flake is an Assistant Professor of Ancient Scripture. She received her PhD in American Literature, with an emphasis in nineteenth-century women’s polemical fiction and narrative theory, from Brandeis University in 2011. She also holds an M.A. in Women’s Studies from Brandeis. Her research focuses on nineteenth-century women’s reform literature and biblical hermeneutics; Mormon women’s history, literature, and print culture in the nineteenth-century; and the Book of Mormon through a narrative lens.
Janalee Emmer
Curator/Head of Education

janalee_emmer@byu.edu | 801-422-5323 | 478 MOA
 
Dr. Janalee Emmer received her doctorate in art history at Pennsylvania State University, and her masters and bachelors at BYU. She has taught at Ohio Wesleyan University, the University of Tennessee, and Bucknell University. Her area of study is Modern and Contemporary art, with particular interest in nineteenth-century French art and women artists from the nineteenth century to the present.  At the BYU MOA, she works as a curator and the head of educational programming.  She has recently worked on several exhibitions featuring women artists, including Minerva Teichert, Jann Haworth, Nina Katchadourian, and Danae Mattes.  She is currently working on an exhibition showcasing women artists from the MOA’s permanent collection.

Chad Emmett
Associate Professor of Geography and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee member
chad_emmett@byu.edu |  674 SWKT

Research Interests: Professor Emmett has research interests in the geography of Israel/Palestine and in understanding how that land may be shared more peacefully. He served a mission in Indonesia, and in the past he worked as an Indonesian linguist for the National Security Agency. He has also taught seminary and was an assistant professor of geography at De Paul University in Chicago.

Chad is a Principal Investigator for The WomanStats Project housed here in the BYU Kennedy Center for International Studies. WomanStats's research agenda is to constantly assess the relationship between the security situation and behavior of states and security of the women living there, and the dynamics between security, stability, and the behavior of the state. 

To learn more about WomenStats, visit their website: http://www.womanstats.org/index.htm . For information about their student coding jobs email: info@womanstats.org.

 

Marlene Esplin
Assistant Professor of Humanities
mhesplin@byu.edu | 801-422-6246 | 3050 JFSB

 
Marlene Hansen-Esplin is Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities with a PhD in Hispanic Cultural Studies from Michigan State University. Her main research areas are translation studies and U.S. and Latin American literatures. Recent projects have centered on the writings of pioneering Chicana authors Gloria Anzaldúa and Margarita Cota-Cárdenas and on the English and Spanish versions of novels by Puerto Rican author Rosario Ferré. She is currently working on an article about the multilingual aspects of works by the multi-media artist Celia Álvarez Muñoz and has started a project that aims to recuperate the translations and writings of early 20th-century U.S. author and translator Fanny Bandelier.
 
 

Renata Forste
Director of the Kennedy Center for International Studies, Professor of Sociology
renata_forste@byu.edu  (801) 422-3377 | 237 HRBC
Gender Studies Related Publications

My training is in demography and I received my PhD from the University of Chicago.  I have been on faculty at BYU since 1995. My research focuses in large part on the relationship between the status of women and the health of their children.  In particular, I have examined how the education of women is related to child survival and well-being in Latin America, as well as the relationship between education and breastfeeding in the US.  I also study patterns of family formation, domestic violence, and family interaction as it influences child well-being.  Ultimately, my concern is that women have the education and resources needed to be healthy, and to provide a healthy environment for their children.  Courses related to Women’s Studies I have taught:  Sociology of Gender (Soc 367), and winter 2012 I will teach Introduction to Women’s Studies (WS 222).

Mara García
Professor of Spanish American Literature
mara_garcia@byu.edu  (801) 422-3106 | 3150 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

One of my areas of research interest is Latin American Female Writers. I am very interested in exploring Female Spaces, Identity, the Female Quest, and the fantastic in female authors among other topics related to Feminist Perspectives. I have taught classes on “Escritoras Hispanoamericanas” on several occasions and seminars about Elena Garro and "Escritoras mexicanas  contemporáneas."  In addition I include female writers in my other classes to have a good representation of women writers. The opportunity to teach these courses has been crucial to the preparation of several of my books, articles, and book reviews.

Melissa Goates-Jones
Assistant Professor of Psychology
melissa_jones@byu.edu  (801) 422-6480 | 272 TLRB BYU

Melissa Goates-Jones is a new full-time addition to the BYU Psychology Department, but not a new addition to BYU. She was most recently a clinical psychologist in Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Center. Her research focuses on psychotherapy process and outcome and on women’s career development. Her clinical focuses are women’s abuse and trauma and other women’s issues in mental health. She co-leads a group for women survivors of sexual abuse and teaches a section of Student Development 117 (Career Exploration) that focuses specifically on women’s career issues. She religiously teaches our Spring section of WS 222.

Leslie Hadfield
Professor of History
leslie_hadfield@byu.edu 

 

Leslie Hadfield earned her PhD in African history at Michigan State University and has been teaching African history at BYU since 2010.  Hadfield primarily studies South African contemporary social and political history. Her research interests include South African liberation movements in the 1960s and 1970s and the experience of black nurses in the Eastern Cape.  She deals with questions of female political, community, and professional roles in her research and discusses continuities and change in gender and gender relations in her courses on African history.  She has conducted extensive oral history interviews in South Africa, particularly with women and retired nurses. 

Anna-Lisa Halling
Assistant Professor of Portuguese
anna-lisa_halling@byu.edu 
(801) 422- 1759 | 3161 JFSB

Anna-Lisa Halling is an Assistant Professor of Portuguese. She received her BA at BYU, where she majored in Spanish and minored in Portuguese. She then completed her MA in Spanish Peninsular Literature at BYU, after which she received her PhD in Hispanic Literature with a Portuguese minor at Vanderbilt University. Her research interests include early modern Iberian convent theater, performance criticism, feminist theory, and spatial theory. She utilizes spatial theory to explore how the space of the convent allowed for religious women to resist the traditional gender norms of the day. She has taught poetry, prose, and drama by Spanish women writers and plans on developing a course on Portuguese women writers in the near future. Additionally, she is interested utilizing performance as a pedagogical tool meant to help students gain new insight into dramatic texts, especially those written by women.

Jennifer Haraguchi
Assistant Professor of Italian
jennifer_haraguchi@byu.edu  801-422- 8179 | 3135 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Jennifer Haraguchi joined the Italian faculty in the Dept of French and Italian in 2011 after receiving a BA from BYU in International Relations, an MA in Italian Studies from the University of Virginia and a PhD in Italian Language and Literature from the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on Counter-Reformation Italy, women’s writings, education, and social and religious history. She has published essays on seventeenth-century convent theater, Venetian women’s fashion in the Renaissance, and post-WWII Italian film, and is currently at work on a critical edition and English translation of the creative works of the seventeenth-century Florentine writer and educator Eleonora Ramirez di Montalvo for the Toronto seriesThe Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. She teaches a senior seminar on Italian Women Writers (Ital 495R).

Dr. Haraguchi small photo

Amy Harris
Associate Professor of History
amy.harris@byu.edu  (801) 422-2276 | 2150 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Professor Harris has served as a member of the Women’s Studies Executive committee and is an active participant in Women’s Studies at BYU, currently serving as the Internship Coordinator.  A native of Ogden, Utah, she completed her undergraduate degree in family history at BYU.  After receiving an MA from American University and a PhD from University of California, Berkeley, she joined the BYU History department in 2006. She earned her professional genealogical credential (AG) in 2007. Her historical and genealogical research focuses on families and women in early modern Britain. In addition to Introduction to Women’s Studies, she teaches European history and British genealogical research courses.  Two of her courses, European women and European families, are among the elective options for Women’s Studies minors.  Her first book, Siblinghood and Social Relations in Georgian England: Share and Share Alike was published by Manchester University Press. Professor Harris was awarded the history department’s Outstanding Teaching Award (Chair Selection) in 2013.

Valerie Hegstrom
Associate Professor of Spanish Literature and Coordinator of Global Women's Studies
valerie_hegstrom@byu.edu (801) 422-3191 | 3148 JFSB


Valerie Hegstrom's research involves the recovery of Early Modern Spanish and Portuguese women authors and their works. She has published books and articles about Early Modern women playwrights and their theater, particularly María de Zayas and Angela de Azevedo. She is currently working on an edition of Bernarda Ferreira de Lacerda's volume of poetry Las soledades de Buçaco (1634), as well as a translation of poems, prose, theater, and letters by Soror Maria do Ceo. Hegstrom offers courses on Spanish women authors, including "Early Modern Women Writers" and "Convent Literature." She has mentored student performances of La muerte del apetito by Sor Marcela de san Félix (2008), El muerto disimulado by Angela de Azevedo (2004), "La fiestecilla del nacimiento" by Sor María de san Alberto (1994), and the Loa al Divino Narciso by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1993). Additionally, she teaches Introduction to Global Women's Studies and supervises the Global Women's Studies Colloquium.  She is a founding member of GEMELA, Grupo de Estudios sobre la Mujer en España y las Américas (pre-1800). She has served as Coordinator of Global Women's Studies since February 2011.

Jane Hinckley
Adjunct Faculty - Comparative Arts & Letters
jane_hinckley@byu.edu | (801) 422-5809 | 3034 JFSB

In Jane Austen’s posthumously published novel, Persuasion (1817), her heroine, Anne Elliot, debates the constancy of women vs. men with her former fiancé’s colleague, Captain Harville; in reply to Harville’s assertion that throughout history men’s writings in “prose and verse” attest to women’s fickleness, Anne declares: “Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands” (Vol. II, Chap. XI).   Reading this encounter in graduate school inspired me to reinstate women’s stories into the male-dominated landscape of literary history through my teaching and writing.

My teaching and research focus on the stories in poetry and fiction penned by British female authors during the long eighteenth-century (1688-1837); in particular, I am intrigued by what these women’s stories reveal about the family during the Georgian era.  My dissertation explored the significance of the illegitimate female character in eighteenth-century British fiction – a new character who acted during this period as a trope for the precarious condition of women in a modern patriarchal society.  I occasionally teach for the Humanities section of the Comparative Arts and Literature Department junior and senior seminars about eighteenth-century British female poets, novelists and artists, with an emphasis on Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Frances Burney and Jane Austen.  More recently, I had the privilege and delightful experience to collaborate with Amy Harris (Dept. of History) and Rachel Cope (Dept. of Church History and Doctrine) in editing a four-volume anthology of primary documents about the family in eighteenth-century England and America.

Erin Holmes
Associate Director of the School of Family Life
erin_holmes@byu.edu (801)-422-5435 | 2086D JFSB

Professor Erin Holmes' training is in human development and family studies.  She received her PhD from The University of Texas at Austin.  She studies mothering, fathering, and co-parenting emphasizing parental well-being, father’s involvement in household work and childrearing, community programs that support parents, and the work-family interface.  She teaches MFHD 524 Theories of Human Development and SFL 395R: Gender, Literature, & the Family, which is cross-listed as one of the WS 390R Special Topics.

Julianne Holt-Lunstad
Associate Professor of Psychology
julianne_holt-lunstad@byu.edu | (801) 422-1324 | 1024 SWKT

Dr. Holt-Lunstad’s program of research takes an interdisciplinary and multi-level approach to understanding the associations between social relationships and long-term health outcomes, factors that may moderate the association, and the biological (autonomic, neuroendocrine, gene) pathways by which these associations occur.  She has also recently begun work that examines how social relationships may be utilized in interventions to potentially reduce risk.  She has been awarded the Citation Award for Excellence in Research by the Society of Behavioral Medicine in 2006, 2008, and 2010, the George A. Miller Award from the American Psychological Association, and has received considerable international media attention for her research.  She is a member of the American Psychosomatic Society, European Health Psychology Society, Society of Personality and Social Psychology, the Association for Psychological Science, American Psychological Association (div 1, 8, 38), and is a fellow of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology.

Jamie Horrocks
Assistant Professor of British Literature
jamie_horrocks@byu.edu  (801) 422-8788 | 4169 JFSB

Assistant Professor Jamie Horrocks teaches classes in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British literature and culture and literature by women. She specializes in late-Victorian aestheticism and gender and sexuality studies. She uses an interdisciplinary Victorian studies methodology in her courses and her research, bringing literary, artistic, popular, and historical texts into conversation in order to broaden the scope of critical analysis.

Professor Horrocks’s research interests include late-nineteenth-century British aestheticism, including high art, popular, and Arts and Crafts aestheticism. Her work in late-Victorian literature and culture includes forays into food culture, Ritualism and British Anglo-Catholicism, history of the book, early Bloomsbury aesthetic theory, neo-Victoriana, and the nineteenth-century narrative essay.

Professor Horrocks received her Ph.D. in English and Victorian Studies from Indiana University in 2010, where she also served as managing editor of Victorian Studies. She completed her MA and BA degrees at Brigham Young University. Her interests are in Victorian, early Modern, gender and sexuality.

Robert Hudson
Assistant Professor of French Literature
bob_hudson@byu.edu (801) 422-6554 | 3113 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Professor Robert J. Hudson of the Dept. of French & Italian focuses his research on lyrical and pastoral verse in Renaissance France, as well as themes of Petrarchism, Gallicism and Imitation Theory, centering on poetic production in 16th-century Lyon. Of this Early Modern intellectual hub of trade and publishing, Lyonnais editor Antoine Du Moulin drew attention to the convivialclimat lyonnois, which he asserts “produced a certain vivacity and aptitude for learning of the fine minds, in all the arts […] in both sexes,” a point that Dr. Hudson attempts to highlight in his treatment of women writers in Lyon: Louise Labé, Pernette Du Guillet, Jeanne Gaillard and Marguerite de Navarre.  In addition to teaching these poets in his course on the Lyonnais lyric, his senior seminar on “Humanism and Reform in Renaissance France” focuses heavily on feministic reform and he has recently directed two MA theses on Renaissance feminism.

Michelle Stott James
Associate Professor of German Studies and Chair of German and Slavic Languages
michelle_james@byu.edu (801) 422-2463 | 3102 JFSB

Since she joined the BYU faculty in 1988, Michelle James has taught numerous courses in literature, writing and critical theory. After the publication of her first book, Dr. James turned her research interests to early German-language women writers. With her colleague Joseph O. Baker, she founded the “Sophie Project,” with the goal of collecting hard-to-access texts by early women authors and making them available in modern format. Over the past 13 years, this undertaking has developed into the Sophie Mentored Research Project, which has engaged numerous students in textual preparation, editing and research on several hundred early women’s texts and musical compositions, which are now freely available to users in the Sophie Digital Library of Early German-Language Women’s Work. She and her students are currently preparing the Critically Annotated Collected Works of Elisa von der Recke, the first volume of which is scheduled to be finished this year.

Jamie Jensen
Associate Professor of Biology 
jamie.jensen@byu.edu  (801) 422-6896 | 4059 LSB
 

Jamie Jensen, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at Brigham Young University in Provo, UT.  She is a Discipline-based Educational Researcher (DBER) studying the underlying mechanisms of successful pedagogical approaches to teaching biology and improving student scientific reasoning ability.  She has recently studied the effects of gender-biased lesson materials on female achievement in science.  

 

Janiece Johnson
Laura F. Willes Visiting Research Associate, Maxwell Institute
janiecejohnson@byu.edu  (801) 422-5606 | 112E B49

Janiece Johnson is currently the Laura F. Willes Visiting Research Associate at BYU's Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. She specializes in American religious history—specifically Mormon history, gender, and the prosecution for the Mountain Meadows Massacre. Dr. Johnson has graduate degrees in American History and Theology from Brigham Young University, Vanderbilt’s Divinity School, and the University of Leicester in England. Her work has included the religious experience of early female Mormon converts, the prosecution for the Mountain Meadows Massacre and its interdependent relationship to the popular narrative told about the massacre. She is co-author of The Witness of Women: First-hand Experiences and Testimonies of the Restoration (Deseret Book, 2016) and general editor of the recently published Mountain Meadows Massacre: Collected Legal Papers (University of Oklahoma Press, 2017). Dr. Johnson’s current research centers on the Book of Mormon and the relationship of early Mormon converts to their new American scripture.  

Recent publications:
Co-author, The Witness of Women: First-hand Experiences and Testimonies of the Restoration (Deseret Book, 2016). General Editor, Mountain Meadows Massacre: Collected Legal Papers (University of Oklahoma Press, 2017).

Melissa Jones
Assistant Professor of Sociology
melissa.s.jones@byu.edu | 2027 JFSB

Gender Studies Related Publications

Melissa S. Jones is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology. She offers expertise in the fields of criminology, gender, family, and general sociology. Her research focuses on gender, crime and deviance, the incarceration of women, and the impact of both trauma and abuse on criminal behaviors. Melissa is particularly interested in bringing awareness to the difficulties that incarcerated women experience both in and out of prison. Her recent research is focused on theoretical explanations of criminal behaviors among women prisoners. Her research has been published in top crime and family journals, such as Justice Quarterly and Child Abuse & Neglect. Melissa has previously taught classes on Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault and Women, Girls, and Crime and hopes to teach these classes in the future here at BYU.

 


Megan Sanborn Jones
Associate Chair of Theater Arts Studies 
and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
msjones@byu.edu  (801) 422-1321 | F-366 HFAC
Gender Studies Related Publications

Megan Sanborn Jones is a Professor of Theatre and coordinates the Theatre Arts Studies BA program. Her scholarly area of research is religious performance in 19th-20th century America and has been published in Theatre Journal, The State of the Art, and Theatre Topics. Her first book, Performing American Identity in Anti-Mormon Melodrama from Routledge Press (2009) won the Mormon History Association Smith-Pettit Best First Book Award.  Her second book project is Walking with the Dead: Reanimating America in Mormon Pageant Performance.  Megan is also a director/choreographer whose credits at BYU include Romeo and Juliet, Arabian Nights, and elementary school touring production of Henry V where Henry was played by a woman. Much of her scholarship deals with the representation of women on stage and screen. Her directing is particularly focused on women’s issues both in content (the plays she chooses to direct) and in form (how she chooses to direct them).

Maggie Kopp
Curator of European Books, L. Tom Perry Special Collections Associate Department Chair
maggie_kopp@byu.edu  (801) 422-6276 |  1113 HBLL

Maggie Gallup Kopp is Curator of Rare Books at L. Tom Perry Special Collections in the Harold B. Lee Library, where she is responsible for the European historical collections and rare British and American literature. She is the curator of the Lee Library’s current exhibit, Victorian Illustrators: from Sketch to Print. She holds an MA from Fordham University and an MLS from the University of Texas at Austin.

 

Connie Lamb
Women's Studies Librarian and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
connie_lamb@byu.edu  (801) 422-6196 | 1202 HBLL

Connie Lamb is currently the Anthropology, Middle East Studies and Women’s Studies Librarian at the Lee Library. In addition to her Master’s in Library Science, she holds Master’s degrees in biology, international relations, and anthropology. Connie’s major research interests  are Mormon women, Middle East women, and the anthropology of food.

Connie is active in several professional library and subject associations, and has served as the President of the BYU Faculty Women’s Association. She has published numerous articles and book reviews and has co-edited two book-length bibliographies. In her efforts to make women’s materials more accessible for researchers, she has developed the following electronic databases related to women: “Guide to Women’s Manuscript Collections”, “Women in the Middle East Bibliography”, the “Mormon Women’s Studies Resource” and “Index to the Relief Society Magazine”.

Chelom Leavitt
Assistant Professor of Family Studies
chelom_leavitt@byu.edu | (801) 422-6573  2054 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications


Dr. Chelom E. Leavitt is an assistant professor in the School of Family Life. She received her PhD at Penn State. Her research focuses on committed sexual relationships, gender, mindfulness and religion. She is working on a project in the U.S., Turkey and Ukraine to examine how mindful people function within sexual relationships. She is also studying whether sexual mindfulness can be taught to couples to improve their individual and relationship functioning.

Daryl Lee
Associate Professor of French 
dlee@byu.edu  (801) 422-9055 | 3133 JFSB

Daryl Lee’s research looks at how the history of French romantic socialism, which is inflected heavily by French debates over the woman question, shaped the reception of Mormonism in 19th-century France. Summer term 2016 he taught a seminar on 19th-century French representations of Mormonism, in which his students read primary source materials from French observers. He has directed seven ORCA projects by four different female students who translated sociological studies on gender issues in Senegal; the translations illuminated problems facing women there (e.g., gender-based violence and property rights) and were posted by WomanStats Project.

 

Julie Lefgren
Adjunct Professor of Chinese Language & Literature
julie_lefgren@byu.edu  (801) 422-6409 |  4060 JKB

 

B.A. Brigham Young University, Comparative Literature, Chinese Minor, Honors Graduate

M.A. University of Oregon, Chinese Language and Literatures

Brianna Magnusson
Assistant Professor of Health Science and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
Brianna_Magnusson@byu.edu  (801) 422-3083 | 2050 LSB

Dr. Magnusson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Science.  She received her Master of Public Health (2005) and PhD (2011) in Epidemiology from Virginia Commonwealth University. Her research interests focus primarily on women’s sexual and reproductive health including the life-course impact of early sexual experiences.  Other areas of interest include unintended pregnancy, contraceptive method choice and use, sexual partnering decisions and breastfeeding.

Nick Mason
Associate Professor of English
nick_mason@byu.edu  (801) 422-4617 | 4107 JFSB

As a specialist in British literature of the Romantic era, Nick Mason frequently teaches eighteenth- and nineteenth-century women writers. One of his most popular courses focuses on the novels of Jane Austen and how our society’s standards for canonicity and “literariness” can depend heavily on a writer’s gender. Among his women’s-studies-related publications are an anthology of Romantic-era satire that attempts to identify a tradition of women’s satire in early nineteenth-century Britain; an essay on Blackwood’s Magazine’s responses to Mary Shelley’s fiction; a book chapter on the marketing of Letitia Elizabeth Landon; and articles on Austen’s responses to her age’s obsession with shopping and its prohibitions on satire by women.


 

 


 

 

Kristin Matthews
Associate Professor of American Literature
Kristin_matthews@byu.edu   (801) 422-5295 | 4160 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Kristin L. Matthews' is Associate Professor of American Literature and a former Program Coordinator of American Studies. Her research and teaching explore postwar American literature and culture, particularly texts associated with social movements coming out of the Cold War -- the civil rights movement, women's movement, and student movements. Her publications examine the ways in which "subjectivity" is authored and read in postwar America, focusing on the ways that race and gender function in a Cold War world. She teaches American literature, African American literature, Women's Literature, and American Studies courses.

Adam McBride
Assistant Professor of French Lingusitics
a_mcbride@byu.edu |  (801) 422-4705 | 3134-B JFSB

I received my PhD in French Linguistics from the University of Texas at Austin. At BYU I regularly teach an Intro to French Linguistics course in which we cover basic areas of linguistics, including sociolingstics (how society influences language and how language is used to negotiate identity). My research is currently focused primarily on French phonology and phonetics (not in relation to women or gender).  have great interest in language and identity and would be happy to mentor similarly interested students in any projects they have in mind. (I have research interests in sociolinguistics -including expression of gender identity through language, studies in gendered language, etc.).


 

Rob McFarland
Associate Professor of German
robmc@byu.edu |  (801) 422-8331 | 3104 JFSB

 


 

Lynne Nielsen
Associate Teaching Professor of Statistics
lynne.nielsen@byu.edu  (801) 422-9202 | 223B TMCB

Professor Lynne Nielsen has a BS in Mathematics and an MS in Statistics. She is currently working on a PhD in Instructional Psychology. Her areas of interest are statistics education, distance education, instructional design, and women's studies. Her work has lately focused on gender and international policies, analyzing data from and creating scales for WomanStats.

Rex P. Nielson
Assistant Professor of Portugese and Brazilian Studies
rex_nielson@byu.edu (801) 422-2176 | 3149 JFSB

Rex P. Nielson (PhD, Brown University, 2010) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Brigham Young University. He researches a variety of issues related to Brazilian literature and film, especially in the fields of Gender Studies and Ecocriticism. He has published articles on several Brazilian women writers, including Lygia Fagundes Telles and Adriana Lisboa, and he is currently working on a book about gender roles in contemporary Brazilian literature and society. He periodically teaches WS 390R: Pan-American Women Writers, along with courses on Luso-Afro-Brazilian literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He is married to Natalie Nielson, and they have five children: Henry, Lucia, Peter, Hazel, and Elias.

Len Novilla
Associate Professor of Public Health
len_novilla@byu.edu    (801) 422-9356 | 2064 LSB

Prior to joining BYU, Len served as a Senior Research Manager for the Thrasher Research Fund and was involved in managing several international and U.S.-based pediatric research grants. She has completed her medical degree at the University of the City of Manila in the Philippines and her Master of Public Health at the University of Utah. She currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Timpanogos Regional Hospital and has reviewed anti-tobacco grants for the State Health Department

Her Research interests include Maternal and child health ,defining the role of the family in promoting health , understanding health risk behaviors among adolescents, and addressing disparities in the delivery and access to health care.

Marie Orton
Professor of Italian Language & Literature and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
marie_orton@byu.edu | (801) 422-3389 | 3139 JFSB


 

Katie Paxman
Professor of Philosophy
katie_paxman@byu.edu | (801) 422-9268 | 4086-A JFSB



 

Martha Peacock
Professor of Art History
Martha_Peacock@byu.edu   (801) 422-2149 | 3053 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Martha Moffitt Peacock is professor of art history at Brigham Young University.  Her research centers on the relationship of art to the lives of women in the Dutch Republic.  Her articles “Proverbial Reframing—Rebuking and Revering Women in Trousers,” “Domesticity in the Public Sphere,” and “The Imaging and Economics of Women Consumers and Merchants in the Netherlandish Marketplace,” deal with themes of female empowerment through art.  She has also published and presented on women artists such as Geertruydt Roghman, Anna Maria van Schurman, and Joanna Koerten. Currently, she is working on her book entitled Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives:  Imaging Women of Consequence in the Dutch Golden Age.


Cecilia Peek
Associate Professor of Classics and Comparative Studies
cecilia_peek@byu.edu (801) 422-4564 | 3035 JFSB

An Associate Professor of Classics, Cecilia Peek's interests include Hellenistic and Roman History, Greek and Latin Prose Literature, and Classical Historiography. Among other topics, she has researched and published on Queen or "King" Cleopatra VII.

Hayley Pierce
Assistant Professor of Sociology
hayley_pierce@byu.edu  | (801) 422-2488 | 2036 JFSB

Hayley Pierce is assistant professor of Sociology. She received her PhD in Demography from the University of California, Berkeley and her masters and bachelors at BYU in Sociology. Her main research focus is on maternal and child health and well-being. This includes the relationship between health care, policy, community, and the status of women and how that influences utilization of services. Her recent work includes the reproductive and child health of Palestinian refugees in Jordan. She teaches Sociology of Gender (Soc 367). 

Jennifer Quinlan
Professor of Instructional Psychology and Technology
jennifer.quinlan@byu.edu (801) 422-8498 | 102 HCEB

Jennifer Dobberfuhl-Quinlan's research focuses on Foreign Language Education and Technology. She is an Academic Product Consultant for the division of Continuing Education and is concluding her doctoral work in Instructional Psychology and Technology and Second Language Acquisition. She taught French and was the administrator of an online school before coming to BYU. She was the first female school administrator in her district and actively works to bring gender balance to her administrative teams. She firmly believes in the benefits mixed gender collaborations can yield.

 

Natalie Wright Romeri-Lewis
Adjunct Professor of International Development, Business Ethics, and Transitional Justice and Women, J.D., M.Sc., B.A., Cert. Mediation                                                                                                                        
natalie_romeri-lewis@byu.edu   (801) 422-8577 | 210 HRBC

Natalie Wright Romeri-Lewis, Senior Project Associate at The WomanStats Project, studied international development, refugees, and law.  She has explored judicial reform and women's informal power in developing nations and lived in Asia, Europe, and Latin America.  She has worked in judicial chambers and NGOs, consulted internationally, and presented to new staff at UN permanent missions on how to improve the quality of contribution and quantity of female negotiators.  Currently, she teaches international development at the Kennedy Center for International Studies, BYU and leads several projects at The WomanStats Project: UN data-collection effort, international outreach (e.g. conferences), recruitment, and training.  She also researches urban poverty among Colombian women, women's leadership during peace and transitional justice processes, and the substantive representation of women (e.g. do female parliamentarians in 176 countries ban anti-woman practices like domestic violence).  In the future, Natalie looks to analyze how truth commissions and reparations processes can better provide human rights victims with an experience that leads to healing and justice as well as whether the timing of the creation of power-sharing “institutions” (e.g. free press, courts, elections, constitutions) and high female participation affect the stability or transparency of newly emerging democracies.  Feel free to attend her new, experimental class "Women, Peace, Transitional Justice, and the Rule of Law" or her semesterly workshops, Community-Building (FAMA technique) or Professionalism and Networking for Future Global Professionals!

Marin Leggat Roper, MFA, CLMA. 
Assistant Professor, Department of Dance
marin_roper@byu.edu | (801) 422-3345 | RB 286

Creative research in contemporary dance choreography examines the intersection of feminine identity, culture and religion.  Marin is motivated by a belief in the right of every woman and girl to live fully expressive lives in and through the body.  A Certified Laban Movement Analyst, she recently developed Moving Out Loud!, a movement and leadership curriculum for adolescent girls and young women applying somatic principles to bold living and bold leading.

Past academic positions include George Washington University, Ohio Wesleyan University, Bingham High School (Utah), and Asian International School (Sri Lanka).

www.movingoutloud.com

Susan Sessions Rugh
Professor of History, Dean of Undergraduate Education
susan_rugh@byu.edu  (801) 422-2742 | 2130 JFSB

Susan Sessions Rugh specializes in the history of travel and tourism and in the history of rural America. She earned a Ph.D. in American history from the University of Chicago in 1993, and has taught at BYU since 1997. She teaches courses in America cultural history and Women’s Studies. Her current research is about family-owned motels and immigrant entrepreneurs from Gujurat, India.

 

George Ryskamp
Associate Professor of History
george_ryskamp@byu.edu  (801) 422-8047 | 2105 JFSB

Professor George Ryskamp specializes in Hispanic and Family history.

 

Carl H. Sederholm
Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities
Chair, Comparative Arts and Letters
carl_sederholm@byu.edu |  3008B JFSB

Over the years, I have written on Lydia Maria Child, a nineteenth century abolitionist and author who was a major influence on Harriet Beecher Stowe and others. I am especially interested in the ways Child comments on religion because she believed it should be grounded in service and feeling rather than in theology and debate. I have also published on Shirley Jackson, a novelist and short story writer best known for her short story "The Lottery." I frequently teach Jackson's novel The Haunting of Hill House in various courses. That novel has grown in popularity over the years and was most recently adapted in 2018 as a Netflix miniseries. 

Kevin Shafer
Associate Professor of Sociology
kevin_shafer@byu.edu  |  801-422-4410  |  2019 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Kevin Shafer joined the SFL faculty of BYU in 2011.  He recently moved to the sociology department and is an Associate Professor in Sociology and Director of Canadian Studies.  His research focuses on marriage and family and emphasizes gender differences in remarriage and parenting addressing three main areas: 1) how men and women experience stepparenting and remarriage differently, 2) he also considers differences in how men and women experience parental roles and 3) gender differences in mental health and help-seeking behavior.

He would like to mentor BYU students interested in fathering, men's mental health, and how paternal mental health impacts father involvement and child wellbeing. He conducts this work in both the US and Canada!

 

Jeffrey Shumway
Professor of History, Argentine/Latin America Emphasis
jshumway@byu.edu  | (801) 422-8943 | 2143 JFSB

Professor Jeffrey Shumway  specializes in Argentina and Latin America History. His research and publications focus around marriage and family issues.

Brandie R. Siegfried
Associate Professor of British Literature
brandie_siegfried@byu.edu  (801) 422-8106 | 4036 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Brandie Siegfried teaches courses in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature. Her special interests include Shakespeare, Renaissance drama, early modern women writers, gender studies, and Irish literary history. She also has an interest in film, and often teaches an Honors course called Film Adaptations of Shakespeare.

She tends to take a cultural studies approach to literature, often providing interdisciplinary perspectives from ethnography, history, science, and art as lenses through which to read Renaissance texts.

Dr. Siegfried received her B.A. and M.A. degrees in English from Brigham Young University, an M.A. in Women's Studies from Brandeis University, and a Ph.D. in Renaissance Literature, also from Brandeis University. She joined the BYU English Department in 1993

Elizabeth Smart
Humanities Department Chair - Humanities and Media Librarian, Associate Librarian

elizabeth_smart@byu.edu | 801-422-4995 | 5452 HBLL

Elizabeth Smart regularly teaches Introduction to Global Women's Studies.


 

 

Delys Waite Snyder
Associate Professor of English and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
delys.snyder@gmail.com  (801) 422-3486 | 4110B JFSB

Delys Waite Snyder, a professor in the English Department, runs the Writing Across the Curriculum program and oversees the advanced writing classes in the English Department. She uses corpus linguistics to research gender and language, in particular to trace language change in the use of non-sexist language.


Anca Sprenger
Associate Professor of French Literature
anca_sprenger@byu.edu     (801) 422-2306 | 3119 JFSB

Dr. Sprenger received her bachelor's degree in French Literature at the University of Bucharest and her PhD at the University of Southern California. Here at BYU she commonly teaches Introduction to French Litary Analysis, and Introduction to Romanian Literature and Culture. Her research interestes include French Literature, especially the persistence of the discourse of the sacred in modern literaty texts. She is currently working on a book about the life and work of Canadian author Gabrielle Roy.

Dr. Anca Sprenger's interests focus in French Literature, especially the persistence of the discourse of the sacred in modern literary texts. Dr. Sprenger examines the impact of secularization and loss of the "Ancien Régime" values on the 19th century French society. She analyzes the way in which sacred gestures, spiritual discourses are recuperated and encoded in modern French literature.

Charlotte A. Stanford
Associate Professor of  Interdisciplinary Humanities and Global Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
charlotte_stanford@byu.edu  (801) 422-4604 | 3038 JFSB

Charlotte Stanford's research interests range from medieval architecture to commemorative practices for the dead, with a strong interest in the role of women as donors and creators of art. She regularly teaches IHUM 201 and IHUM 202 (a two-semester sequence for the General Education of History of Western Civilization) and enjoys highlighting the contributions of womens such as Marie de France, Artemesia Gentileschi and Clara Schumann into her survey courses. She has recently published The Building Accounts of the Savoy Hospital, London, 1505-1520, with Boydell Press (2015) and is currently continuing her research on the men and women in the building industry of early Tudor London. Professor Stanford is the current faculty advisor to Volume IV of the Women's Studies Student Journal: A Woman's Experience.

Catherine Gines Taylor
Postdoctoral Fellow, Neal A. Maxwell Institute
catherine_taylor@byu.edu


Gender Studies Related Publications

Catherine Gines Taylor specializes in late antique Christian art history and iconography. Dr. Taylor’s research emphasis is the interdisciplinary study of art, scripture, lay piety, patronage, and patristic texts. More specifically, her work centers on images of women in early Christian contexts with special emphasis on the conflation of archetypal biblical women with late antique Christian women as represented within memorial settings. Her work has taken her from the catacombs in Rome to the storerooms of the British Museum to excavation sites in the Egyptian Fayoum. Dr. Taylor’s current research investigates the typologies of Susanna and Wisdom on sarcophagi and other funerary monuments. Her monograph on the iconography of the Annunciation is being published by Brill, 2017.

 

Michael Taylor
Associate Professor of English
mike_taylor@byu.edu (801) 422-2481 | 4153 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

After graduating from BYU in English and German Studies, Mike Taylor completed an MA in American Studies from Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg and received a PhD in English from the University of British Columbia in 2016. He teaches courses in Indigenous and American literature and culture. His current research focuses on Indigenous women’s literary activism throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Leslee Thorne-Murphy
Associate Professor of English Literature
leslee_thorne-murphy@byu.edu (801) 422-1506 | 4034 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Leslee Thorne-Murphy is an assistant professor of English with a specialty in Victorian literature.  She teaches survey courses in British literature as well as more specialized courses in various aspects of Victorian literature and women’s studies.

Her research interests include women’s literature, book history, and scholarly editing. Presently she is working on two book-length projects.  The first is an edited volume of diaries written by Rhoda Ann Burgess, an LDS pioneer who settled in southern Utah.  The diaries give invaluable insight into the daily life of a common woman on the frontier.

Her second project is a monograph exploring print culture at Victorian fundraising bazaars.  Almost entirely organized, supplied, and staffed by women, these bazaars contributed to the massive philanthropic efforts common to the Victorian period and became a vital component in women’s cultural experience.

Julie Valentine
Assistant Professor of Nursing
julie_valentine@byu.edu   (801) 422-3164 | 532 SKWT

Julie Valentine MS, RN, CNE, SANE-A, is an Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University College of Nursing.  Her clinical specialty and research focus areas are forensic nursing, violence against women, and sexual assault.  Julie is a certified sexual assault nurse examiner with Salt Lake Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners and Primary Children’s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah.  She is also a full-time PhD in Nursing student at Duquesne University, completion in December 2015.  Julie is principal investigator in a collaborative research project with the Utah state crime laboratory exploring the impact of new DNA testing methods, specifically Y-STR analysis, on evidence collection following sexual assault.  Preliminary findings from the pilot study have resulted in statewide policy changes in evidence collection protocols.  Julie has received funding to expand this collaborative database throughout Utah resulting in a robust dataset on sexual assault cases in Utah from 2010 to 2013.   Julie is also principal investigator in a collaborative study developing a law enforcement training program for sexual assault cases with the State of Utah Attorney General’s office and a large law enforcement agency in Salt Lake County, Utah.   In October 2013, Julie completed the National Institute of Justice sexual assault nurse examiner toolkit on criminal case outcomes in sexual assault cases for Salt Lake County, Utah from 2003 – 2011.  The findings from the toolkit have resulted in changes in law enforcement agencies and the district attorney’s office.  Julie’s research and practice primarily consists of women as both research subjects and patients.

Evan R. Ward
Associate Professor of History
evan_ward@byu.edu    (801) 422-8506 | 2115 JFSB

Dr. Evan R. Ward is associate professor of history in the department of history at Brigham Young University. He received a BA in history from Brigham Young University (1995) and an MA (1997) and PhD (2000), both in history, from the University of Georgia. Dr. Ward is a scholar of (1) tourism development in Latin America and (2) global travel and intellectual development. He is currently writing a book manuscript on the role of travel in intellectual development during the twentieth century. The project, subsequently entitled, “Foxes [a reference to broad, rather than narrow, learners] Will Roam: Curiosity and Mobility in the Twentieth Century,” looks at the experiences of male and female travelers as companions in pursuit of knowledge. He has completed archival work on female travelers at Oxford University, Cambridge University, Smith College, and the Rockefeller Archives. His work at Cambridge was supported by a grant from the College of General Studies (2011). His research at the Rockefeller Archives was supported by an external grant from the Rockefeller Archive Center (2010).

Jen Watson
Assistant Professor of 2-D Studio Art
Department of Art
jen_watson@byu.edu  |  801.422.3033  |  B481C HFAC

Jen Watson teaches printmaking and other 2-D studio courses within the Department of Art. Her visual work reflects a feminine approach to confessional conversation with appendages of social perception and cultural red herrings.

Recently, Jen was involved in a project called "The Bee in the Bonnet," where she–along with BYU colleagues and students–travelled to North Adams, Massachusetts, and worked with the Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum. The intent was to explore connections between Susan B. Anthony, clothing reform, and the suffragist movement. Visual work that was created as part of this collaboration is currently part of an exhibition that is traveling around the New England region to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment. Jen also co-created a collaborative artist-book project called "A Show of Hands," that highlights the works of 39 female printmakers throughout the state of Utah.
 


Jarica Watts
Assistant Professor of English
jarica_watts@byu.edu (801) 422-4938 | 4198 JFSB

Jarica Watts holds a Ph.D. in British and American Literature from the University of Utah. She specializes in twentieth-century British literature, the modern British short story, she has a particular interest in the representation of the First and Second World Wars. Dr. Watts also works on early and mid-twentieth-century middle- to low-brow writing and enjoys teaching neglected authors from this time period.  Dr. Watts has published work on James Joyce, Zadie Smith, Joseph Conrad, and Chinua Achebe. She is also the editor of the book collection, Here Lies Lalo, which brings into prominence the works of Chicago poet Abelardo "Lalo" Delgado. Fashion (Italian shoes), fitness (half-marathoner), photographer (Canon 5D), and her two children (ages 8 and 2) are the things that engage her with life.  

Paul Westover
Assistant Professor of English
paw@byu.edu (801) 422-3048 4149 JFSB

Gender Studies Related Publications


Paul Westover joined the BYU faculty in 2008. He specializes in British Romantic-era literature and cultural history, and he regularly teaches works by women writers of the early nineteenth century. He has special interests in women’s poetry, travel writing, and “homes and haunts.” His first book, Necromanticism, is a study of literary tourism and ritual relations with the literary dead.

Lorraine Wood
Adjunct Instructor in English
lorraine_wood@byu.edu (801) 422-8029 | 4030 JFSB

Professor Wood earned her Ph.D. in English (British & American Literature) from the University of Utah. Her doctoral dissertation is titled "The Language of Music: Paradigms of Performance in Dante Rossetti, Vernon Lee, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf".  Her research focuses on Victorian and British modern writers, women writers, interrelations of the arts, and the Nineteenth-century novel. She loves teaching and has been teaching courses at BYU in Interdiscipinary Humanities, Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Honor's English Woomen Writers, Literary Interpretation & Criticism, and our Introduction to Women's Studies class.  

Mary Jane Woodger
Associate Professor of Church History
maryjane_woodger@byu.edu   (801) 422-9029 | 275E JSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Mary Jane Woodger, Ed.D., is a professor of Church history and doctrine at Brigham Young University. Born and raised in American Fork and Salt Lake City, Utah, Mary Jane has always had a great love for teaching. After obtaining a bachelor’s degree in home economics education, she taught home economics and American history in Salt Lake City. In 1992, she completed her master of education degree at Utah State University, and in 1997, she received from Brigham Young University a doctor of education degree in educational leadership, with a minor in Church history and doctrine. She was honored by Kappa Omicron Nu with the Award of Excellence for her dissertation research, entitled The Educational Ideals of David O. McKay. Since then, Dr. Woodger has written and published several books including three books about the life and teachings of David O. McKay, as well as a book on the timely subject of self-esteem. She has also authored numerous articles on doctrinal, historical, and educational subjects. These articles have appeared in various academic journals, as well as the Journal of Book of Mormon Studies, the Church News, the Ensign, and The Religious Educator. Recently, Dr. Woodger received the Best Article of the Year Award from the Utah Historical Society, as well as the Brigham Young University Faculty Women’s Association Teaching Award. Dr. Woodger’s current research interests include twentieth-century Church history, Latter-day Saint women’s history, and Church education. Her research always includes women’s connections in Church history.

Niwako Yamawaki
Associate Professor of Psychology
Niwako_yamawaki@byu.edu (801) 422-8053 | 1094 SWKT
Gender Studies Related Publications

Niwako Yamawaki is an associate professor of the Department of Psychology at Brigham Young University where she teaches in the area of applied social psychology and the psychology of gender. Her research focuses on investigating how sexism and gender roles influence the perception of violence against women. She also conducts such studies in a cross-cultural setting by examining the roles of cultural factors to understand these world-wide social concerns.