Brigham Young University
1065 JFSB • 801-422-2276
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Women's Studies Affiliated Faculty Members

Full Time Faculty:

Kif Augustine-Adams
(Law)
Donna Lee Bowen
(Political Science)

Laura Bridgewater
(Micro-Biology)
Cindy Brewer 
(German studies)

Rachel Cope
(LDS Church History & Doctrine)
Shirly Cox
(Social Work)
Gloria Cronin
(American Literature)
Rebecca de Schweinitz
(History)
Eric Dursteler
(History)
Amy Easton-Flake
(Ancient Scripture)
Jessie L. Embry
(Western Studies)
Cynthia Finlayson 
(Anthropology)
Vanessa Fitzgibbon 
(Brazilian Literature)
Renata Forste
(Sociology)

Mara García 
(Spanish-American Literature)
Leslie Hadfield
(English)
Kristine Hansen 
(English)
Jennifer Haraguchi
(Italian Literature)
Amy Harris
(History)
Tim Heaton
(Sociology)
Valerie Hegstrom 
(Spanish Literature)
Erin Holmes
(School of Family Life)
Jamie Horrocks 
(British Literature)
Robert Hudson 
(French Literature)
Michelle Stott James
(German Studies)
Heather Belnap Jensen
(Art History)
Megan Sanborn Jones 
(Theater)
Connie Lamb 
(Women's Studies Librarian)

Christopher Lund 
(Portugese)
Kristin Matthews
(American Studies)
Nick Mason
(English)
Lynne Nielsen
(Statistics)
Len Novilla
(Public Health)
Camille Fronk Olsen 
(Ancient Scripture)
Martha Peacock
(Art History)
Cecilia Peek 
(Classics & Comparative Studies)
Cheryl Preston
(Law)
Susan Sessions Rugh
(History)
George Ryskamp
(History)
Kevin Shafer
(Social Work)
Julianne Holst-Lunstad
(Psychology)

 

Jeffrey Shumway
(Argentine/ Latin America History)
Brandie R. Siegfried 

(British Literature)
Delys Waite Snyder
(English)
Diane Louise Spangler
(Psychology)
Anca Sprenger 
(French)
Charlotte A. Stanford
(Interdisciplinary Humanities
Leslee Thorne-Murphy
(English)
Jacqueline Thursby 
(American Literature/Folklore)
Evan R. Ward
(History)
Paul Westover
(English)
Mary Jane Woodger
(Church History)
Niwako Yamawaki
(Psychology)

 

Adjunct Faculty:

Melissa Goates-Jones
(Psycho-therapist, Counseling Center) Catherine Jeppsen
(Sociology)
Lorraine Wood
(English)

Kif Augustine-Adams
Professor of Law
adamsk@law.byu.edu 

Kif Augustine-Adams is the Charles E. Jones Professor of Law and former Associate Dean for Research and Academic Affairs (January 2008 - July 2013) at the Law School.  She regularly teaches a feminist legal theory course at the law school.  During the 2013-2014 academic year, she was a Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer at Renmin University Law School in Beijing where she also taught feminist legal theory. 

Donna Lee Bowen
Professor of Political Science
donna_bowen@byu.edu (801) 422-3409 | 794 SWKT
Gender Studies Related Publications

Donna Lee Bowen is a Professor of Political Science and Middle East Studies at BYU where she teaches courses in comparative politics, Middle East politics, Middle East area studies, and gender politics.Professor Bowen writes on the intersection of religion, tradition and politics in the Middle East and has authored articles and a forth-coming book on attempts to construct policy which reflects Muslim sensibilities, specifically social policy concerning family planning and abortion. Her edited book, Everyday Life in the Muslim Middle East (with Evelyn A. Early), is widely used in universities. She has traveled and lived in North Africa and the Middle East, and has held two Fulbright grants, as well as funding from the Ford Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the David M. Kennedy Center.

Cindy Brewer
Associate Professor of German Studies
Cindy_Brewer@byu.edu   (801) 422-8057 | 3111 JFSB


Laura Bridgewater
Associate Professor and Chair of Molecular Biology
laura_bridgewater@byu.edu  (801) 422-2434 | 591 WIDB

Laura Bridgewater is the faculty advisor to the student academic group "Women in Science."

 

Rachel Cope
Assistant Professor of Church History and Doctrine
rachel_cope@byu.edu (801) 422-3367 | 210J JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Rachel Cope is an Assistant Professor of Church History and Doctrine. She received her PhD in American history, with an emphasis on religious history and women's history, from Syracuse University in 2009. Dr. Cope's research interests include women's spirituality and conversion narratives in eighteenth and nineteenth century America. She teaches Mormon Women's History (WS 390R).

Shirley Cox
Professor of Social Work
shirley_cox@byu.edu (801) 422-4320 | 2179 JFSB

Dr. Shirley E. Cox has a PhD/DSW in Social Work from the University of Utah (1986) and an MSW degree from Howard University in Washington, D.C. (1967). She has spent 50 years in direct practice and administrative positions in the social work practice field and 25 years as a social work educator at Weber State, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Brigham Young University.She has received numerous financial grants totaling over 8 million dollars and awards for her teaching and community practice including: the Liberal Arts Outstanding Faculty Award, the Morris Committee on Excellence in Teaching Award, the NASW Nevada Chapter Social Worker of the Year (1990), and the John R. Christiansen Honored Educator Award, (2003) for significant contributions to the field in university, family, community, national and international arenas.

Since jointing the faculty at BYU in 1995, Dr. Cox has published thirty two articles or book chapters in six different areas of social work: field practicum administration, strengthening family systems, HIV/AIDS treatment validity, same sex attraction, international program and community development, and the JUCONI street children’s program. Her individual and jointly authored publications appear in outlets such as: The Journal of International Social Work andthe Journal of Social Work Education.

Sarah Coyne
Associate Professor in the School of Family Life
smcoyne@byu.edu (801) 422-6949 | 2087 JFSB

Dr. Sarah M. Coyne is an associate professor in the School of Family Life at BYU. She studies how women are portrayed in the media and how viewing such portrayals influences aggression, body image, sexual behavior, and more. Her most recent study involved how viewing Disney Princesses influences behavior in preschool girls. 

 

Gloria Cronin
Professor of American Literature
gloria_cronin@byu.edu (801) 422-2481 | 4147 JFSB

Dr. Cronin's fields of interest include: African-American, Jewish-American, and contemporary American literature, postcolonial and post-imperial Anglophone literatures, postcolonial theories, postmodern theory, and gender theory. She teaches African-American, Jewish-American, Women's and Twentieth Century Anglo-American literatures, Postcolonial literature, and Contemporary  Theory. ook Length Publications concerning Women’s and Gender Studies include:

- A Room of His Own: In Search of the Feminine in the Novels of Saul Bellow. Syracuse University Press, 2001
- Zora Neale Hurston: Critical    Essays. Ed. Macmillan (G. K. Hall), 1998.
- A Room of His Own: Male Monologists: In Search of the Feminine in the Novels of Saul Bellow, Syracuse UP, 2000
- Tales of Molokai: The Voice of Harriet Ne.Collected, edited, and introduced. Honolulu: Institute for Polynesian Studies/U of Hawaii P, 1992.

 

Eric Dursteler
Professor of History
ericd@byu.edu 801-422-5260 | 2129 JFSB

Eric Dursteler joined the History Department of Brigham Young University in 1998, where he is an associate professor.  He earned his PhD from Brown University in 2000.  His research focuses on gender, religious identity and food in the the early modern Mediterranean.  He has received research fellowships from the Fulbright Commission, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, the American Philosophical Society, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, and the Folger Shakespeare and Huntington libraries.  His publications include Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean (2006, Turkish translation 2012), Renegade Women: Gender, Identity and Boundaries in the Early Modern Mediterranean (2011, Turkish translation 2013), and as editor, A Companion to Venetian History, 1400-1797 (2013).  His next book, The Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean World, co-authored with Monique O’Connell, will be published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2014. He is also currently working on a book on food and foodways in the early modern Mediterranean. He is the editor of the News on the Rialto, and book review editor for the Journal of Early Modern History.  He and his wife Whitney have three children and one grandchild

 

Rebecca de Schweinitz
Associate Professor of History
rld@byu.edu (801) 422-1594 | 2162 JFSB

Dr. de Schweinitz received her PhD in History from the University of Virginia in 2004 where much of her graduate coursework focused on American women and gender history. After researching and writing about late-nineteenth, early-twentieth-century women’s history she began to think about how to use gender theory in the new field of children’s history. Her research on children and youth in the civil rights movement and on childhood, “family values,” and American slavery draws on her expertise in women and gender history. A new research project examines the movement to lower the voting age to 18 in the United States in a number of different contexts, including the modern feminist movement. She teaches U.S. Women’s History and a research and writing course on race and gender in twentieth century America. She has also mentored a number of student theses and independent research projects on women and gender history.

Amy Easton-Flake
Assistant Professor of Ancient Scripture

801-422-3358  |  210L JSB
 
Amy Easton-Flake is an Assistant Professor of Ancient Scripture. She received her PhD in American Literature, with an emphasis in nineteenth-century women’s polemical fiction and narrative theory, from Brandeis University in 2011. She also holds an M.A. in Women’s Studies from Brandeis. Her research focuses on nineteenth-century women’s reform literature and biblical hermeneutics; Mormon women’s history, literature, and print culture in the nineteenth-century; and the Book of Mormon through a narrative lens.
 

Jessie L. Embry
Associate Director, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies
801-422-7585 
Gender Studies Related Publications

Jessie L. Embry is the Associate Director of the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies and an associate research professor in the history department. She specializes in Mormon history and oral history. Many of the oral history programs she has directed deal with women's studies.

 

Cynthia Finlayson
Associate Professor of Anthropology (Ancient, Classical, and Islamic Archaeology and Museum Studies)
calderfin@aol.com  (801) 422-5628 | 864 SWKT
Gender Studies Related Publications

Cynthia Finlayson currently holds two archaeological excavation concessions at Palmyra and Apamea, Syria and a major museum development project at the Azem Palace in Damascus that focusses on women's costume in Ottoman Syria. She consults on a regular basis with the Syrian Department of Antiquities. Her major research interests involve the roles of women in both the ancient and Islamic Near East. Students interested in being involved in her projects and being considered for both travel and research grants should contact her.

Vanessa Fitzgibbon
Assistant Professor of Brazilian Literature
vco2@byu.edu  (801) 422-2496 | 3145 JFSB

Professor Fitzgibbon earned her Masters degree in Portuguese from Brigham Young University and her Doctorate degree from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Her main area of research is contemporary Brazilian literature and film with emphasis on racial discrimination and resentment in the establishment of the Brazilian identity (mainly 19th and 20th centuries). Some interests include poetry and theater as well as cultural and historical studies in Brazil and Latin America.

 

Renata Forste
Professor of Sociology
renata_forste@byu.edu  (801) 422-3146 | 2008C JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

My training is in demography and I received my PhD from the University of Chicago.  I have been on faculty at BYU since 1995. My research focuses in large part on the relationship between the status of women and the health of their children.  In particular, I have examined how the education of women is related to child survival and well-being in Latin America, as well as the relationship between education and breastfeeding in the US.  I also study patterns of family formation, domestic violence, and family interaction as it influences child well-being.  Ultimately, my concern is that women have the education and resources needed to be healthy, and to provide a healthy environment for their children.  Courses related to Women’s Studies I have taught:  Sociology of Gender (Soc 367), and winter 2012 I will teach Introduction to Women’s Studies (WS 222).

Mara García
Professor of Spanish American Literature
mara_garcia@byu.edu  (801) 422-3106 | 3150 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

One of my areas of research interest is Latin American Female Writers. I am very interested in exploring Female Spaces, Identity, the Female Quest, and the fantastic in female authors among other topics related to Feminist Perspectives. I have taught classes on “Escritoras Hispanoamericanas” on several occasions and seminars about Elena Garro and "Escritoras mexicanas  contemporáneas."  In addition I include female writers in my other classes to have a good representation of women writers. The opportunity to teach these courses has been crucial to the preparation of several of my books, articles, and book reviews.

Melissa Goates-Jones
pshycho-therapist, Counseling Center
melissa_jones@byu.edu  (801) 422-9235 | 1573 WSC

Melissa Goates-Jones is an adjunct faculty member and licensed psychologist in Counseling and Psychological Services in the Career and Counseling Center. Her research focuses on psychotherapy process and outcome and on women’s career development. Her clinical focuses are women’s abuse and trauma and other women’s issues in mental health. She co-leads a group for women survivors of sexual abuse and teaches a section of Student Development 117 (Career Exploration) that focuses specifically on women’s career issues.

Leslie Hadfield
Professor of History
leslie_hadfield@byu.edu 
Related

Leslie Hadfield earned her PhD in African history at Michigan State University and has been teaching African history at BYU since 2010.  Hadfield primarily studies South African contemporary social and political history. Her research interests include South African liberation movements in the 1960s and 1970s and the experience of black nurses in the Eastern Cape.  She deals with questions of female political, community, and professional roles in her research and discusses continuities and change in gender and gender relations in her courses on African history.  She has conducted extensive oral history interviews in South Africa, particularly with women and retired nurses. 

 
 

Kristine Hansen
Professor of English
kristine_hansen@byu.edu   (801) 422-4775 | 4177 JFSB

Kristine Hansen is Professor of English at BYU, joining the faculty in 1987. Dr. Hansen’s specialties are writing and rhetoric. She teaches undergraduate courses in advanced writing, rhetorical style, and the history of civilization. Her Civilization 2 class takes up women’s issues by tracing how women were considered inferior by theologians and shut out of political decision-making until they began the suffrage movement, using rhetoric superbly to gain not only the vote but many other rights and privileges.  Dr. Hansen teaches graduate courses on rhetorical theory and research methods. From 1998 – 2003 she served as associate dean of Undergraduate Education, directing the university’s writing-across-the-curriculum program. Her current administrative assignment is director of the university’s Internship Office. She received the Karl G. Maeser Excellence in Teaching Award and has been named a Karl G. Maeser Professor of General Education and a Humanities Professor of English. 

 

Jennifer Haraguchi
Assistant Professor of Ilialian
jennifer_haraguchi@byu.edu  801-422- 8179 | 3135 JFSB
Gender Studies Relation Publications

Jennifer Haraguchi joined the Italian faculty in the Dept of French and Italian in 2011 after receiving a BA from BYU in International Relations, an MA in Italian Studies from the University of Virginia and a PhD in Italian Language and Literature from the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on Counter-Reformation Italy, women’s writings, education, and social and religious history. She has published essays on seventeenth-century convent theater, Venetian women’s fashion in the Renaissance, and post-WWII Italian film, and is currently at work on a critical edition and English translation of the creative works of the seventeenth-century Florentine writer and educator Eleonora Ramirez di Montalvo for the Toronto seriesThe Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. She teaches a senior seminar on Italian Women Writers (Ital 495R).

Dr. Haraguchi small photo

Amy Harris
Associate Professor of History
amy.harris@byu.edu  (801) 422-2276 | 2150 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Professor Harris is a member of the Women’s Studies Executive committee and an active participant in Women’s Studies at BYU.  A native of Ogden, Utah, she completed her undergraduate degree in family history at BYU.  After receiving an MA from American University and a PhD from University of California, Berkeley, she joined the BYU History department in 2006. She earned her professional genealogical credential (AG) in 2007. Her historical and genealogical research focuses on families and women in early modern Britain. In addition to Introduction to Women’s Studies, she teaches European history and British genealogical research courses.  Two of her courses, European women and European families, are among the elective options for Women’s Studies minors.  Her first book, Siblinghood and Social Relations in Georgian England: Share and Share Alike was published by Manchester University Press. Professor Harris was awarded the history department’s Outstanding Teaching Award (Chair Selection) in 2013.

Tim Heaton
Professor of Sociology
tim_heaton@byu.edu  (801) 422-3280 | 2033 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Dr.  Tim B. Heaton holds a Camilla Kimball chair in the Department of Sociology at Brigham Young University. His research focuses on demographic trends in the family. Research in the United States and Indonesia has focused on trends in and determinants of marital dissolution. He has examined the relationship between family characteristics and children’s health in Latin America. He is currently analyzing religious group differences in socio-economic status, family characteristics, and health in developing countries. He is a co-editor of Biodemography and Social Biology.

Valerie Hegstrom
Associate Professor of Spanish Literature and Coordinator of Women's Studies
hegstrom@byu.edu | (801) 422-3191 | 1065 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Valerie Hegstrom's research involves the recovery of Early Modern Spanish and Portuguese women authors and their works. She has published books and articles about Early Modern women playwrights and their theater, particularly María de Zayas and Angela de Azevedo. She is currently working on an edition of Bernarda Ferreira de Lacerda's volume of poetry Las soledades de Buçaco (1634), as well as a translation of poems, prose, theater, and letters by Soror Maria do Ceo.

Hegstrom offers courses on Spanish women authors, including "Early Modern Women Writers" and "Convent Literature." She has mentored student performances of La muerte del apetito by Sor Marcela de san Félix (2008), El muerto disimulado by Angela de Azevedo (2004), "La fiestecilla del nacimiento" by Sor María de san Alberto (1994), and the Loa al Divino Narciso by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1993). Additionally, she teaches "Introduction to Women's Studies" and supervises the "Women's Studies Colloquium."

She is a founding member of GEMELA, Grupo de Estudios sobre la Mujer en España y las Américas (pre-1800). She has served as Coordinator of Women's Studies since February 2011.

Erin Holmes
Assistant Professor in the School of Family Life
erin_holmes@byu.edu (801)-422-5435 | 2092C JFSB

Professor Erin Holmes' training is in human development and family studies.  She received her PhD from The University of Texas at Austin.  She studies mothering, fathering, and co-parenting emphasizing parental well-being, father’s involvement in household work and childrearing, community programs that support parents, and the work-family interface.  She teaches SFL 471: Philosophies of Family Work and Relationships in the Home, which is cross-listed as a Women’s Studies elective.

Julianne Holst-Lunstad
Associate Professor of Psychology
Julianne_holt-lunstad@byu.edu 801-422-1324 1024 SWKT

Dr. Holt-Lunstad’s program of research takes an interdisciplinary and multi-level approach to understanding the associations between social relationships and long-term health outcomes, factors that may moderate the association, and the biological (autonomic, neuroendocrine, gene) pathways by which these associations occur.  She has also recently begun work that examines how social relationships may be utilized in interventions to potentially reduce risk.  She has been awarded the Citation Award for Excellence in Research by the Society of Behavioral Medicine in 2006, 2008, and 2010, the George A. Miller Award from the American Psychological Association, and has received considerable international media attention for her research.  She is a member of the American Psychosomatic Society, European Health Psychology Society, Society of Personality and Social Psychology, the Association for Psychological Science, American Psychological Association (div 1, 8, 38), and is a fellow of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology.

Jamie Horrocks
Assistant Professor of British Literature
jamie_horrocks@byu.edu  (801) 422-8788 | 4169 JFSB

Assistant Professor Jamie Horrocks teaches classes in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British literature and culture and literature by women. She specializes in late-Victorian aestheticism and gender and sexuality studies. She uses an interdisciplinary Victorian studies methodology in her courses and her research, bringing literary, artistic, popular, and historical texts into conversation in order to broaden the scope of critical analysis.

Professor Horrocks’s research interests include late-nineteenth-century British aestheticism, including high art, popular, and Arts and Crafts aestheticism. Her work in late-Victorian literature and culture includes forays into food culture, Ritualism and British Anglo-Catholicism, history of the book, early Bloomsbury aesthetic theory, neo-Victoriana, and the nineteenth-century narrative essay.

Professor Horrocks received her Ph.D. in English and Victorian Studies from Indiana University in 2010, where she also served as managing editor of Victorian Studies. She completed her MA and BA degrees at Brigham Young University. Her interests are in Victorian, early Modern, gender and sexuality.

Robert Hudson
Assistant Professor of French Literature
bob_hudson@byu.edu (801) 422-6554 | 3113 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Professor Robert J. Hudson of the Dept. of French & Italian focuses his research on lyrical and pastoral verse in Renaissance France, as well as themes of Petrarchism, Gallicism and Imitation Theory, centering on poetic production in 16th-century Lyon. Of this Early Modern intellectual hub of trade and publishing, Lyonnais editor Antoine Du Moulin drew attention to the convivialclimat lyonnois, which he asserts “produced a certain vivacity and aptitude for learning of the fine minds, in all the arts […] in both sexes,” a point that Dr. Hudson attempts to highlight in his treatment of women writers in Lyon: Louise Labé, Pernette Du Guillet, Jeanne Gaillard and Marguerite de Navarre.  In addition to teaching these poets in his course on the Lyonnais lyric, his senior seminar on “Humanism and Reform in Renaissance France” focuses heavily on feministic reform and he has recently directed two MA theses on Renaissance feminism.

Michelle Stott James
Associate Professor of German Studies and Chair of German and Slavic Languages
michelle_james@byu.edu (801) 422-2463 | 3102 JFSB

Since she joined the BYU faculty in 1988, Michelle James has taught numerous courses in literature, writing and critical theory. After the publication of her first book, Dr. James turned her research interests to early German-language women writers. With her colleague Joseph O. Baker, she founded the “Sophie Project,” with the goal of collecting hard-to-access texts by early women authors and making them available in modern format. Over the past 13 years, this undertaking has developed into the Sophie Mentored Research Project, which has engaged numerous students in textual preparation, editing and research on several hundred early women’s texts and musical compositions, which are now freely available to users in the Sophie Digital Library of Early German-Language Women’s Work. She and her students are currently preparing the Critically Annotated Collected Works of Elisa von der Recke, the first volume of which is scheduled to be finished this year.

Heather Belnap Jensen
Associate Professor of Art History and Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
heather_jensen@byu.edu  (801) 422-8242 | 3122E JKB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Heather Belnap Jensen is an associate professor of art history who specializes in nineteenth-century European art and culture and gender studies. Her research focuses on women in the art world of post-Revolutionary France. She is the co-editor, along with Temma Balducci and Pamela Warner, of Interior Portraiture and Masculine Identity in France, 1789-1914 (Ashgate, 2011), with a contribution on the artist and father-daughter portraiture. Jensen and Balducci are currently working on a pendant to this volume that centers on women, bourgeois femininity, and public spaces in nineteenth-century visual culture. She is also working on a book manuscript tentatively titled Art, Fashion, and the Modern Woman in Post-Revolutionary France.


Megan Sanborn Jones
Associate Professor of Theater Arts Studies
msjones@byu.edu  (801) 422-1321 | F-341 HFAC
Gender Studies Related Publications

Megan Sanborn Jones is an Associate Professor of Theatre and coordinates the Theatre Arts Studies BA program. Her scholarly area of research is religious performance in 19th-20th century America and has been published in Theatre Journal, The State of the Art, and Theatre Topics. Her first book, Performing American Identity in Anti-Mormon Melodrama from Routledge Press (2009) won the Mormon History Association Smith-Pettit Best First Book Award.  Her secon d book project is Walking with the Dead: Reanimating America in Mormon Pageant Performance.  Megan is also a director/choreographer whose credits at BYU include Romeo and Juliet, Arabian Nights, and elementary school touring production of Henry 5 where Henry was played by a woman. Much of her scholarship deals with the representation of women on stage and screen. Her directing is particularly focused on women’s issues both in content (the plays she chooses to direct) and in form (how she chooses to direct them).

 

Connie Lamb
Women's Studies Librarian
connie_lamb@byu.edu  (801) 422-6196 | 1202 HBLL

Connie Lamb is currently the Anthropology, Middle East Studies and Women’s Studies Librarian at the Lee Library. In addition to her Master’s in Library Science, she holds Master’s degrees in biology, international relations, and anthropology. Connie’s major research interests  are Mormon women, Middle East women, and the anthropology of food.

Connie is active in several professional library and subject associations, and has served as the
President of the BYU Faculty Women’s Association. She has published numerous articles and
book reviews and has co-edited two book-length bibliographies. In her efforts to make women’s
materials more accessible for researchers, she has developed the following electronic databases
related to women: “Guide to Women’s Manuscript Collections”, “Women in the Middle East
Bibliography”, the “Mormon Women’s Studies Resource” and “Index to the Relief Society
Magazine”.

Christopher Lund
Professor of Portuguese
christopher_lund@byu.edu (801) 422-1759 | 3161 JFSB

Dr. Christopher Lund's Women’s Studies bent is a historical one—within the framework of Portugal and Portuguese literature.  He was struck decades ago with the rhetorical complaint of the letters of a nun (Marianna Alcoforada of Beja, Portugal) whose epistles articulating the slights rendered her by a French lieutenant appeared in the seventeenth century, in both French and Portuguese, fanning the nascent flames of European feminism. This cycle of unrequited love took on bolder dimensions and came full circle in 1974 when three Marys of different last names put together another book of letters, Novas Cartas Portuguesas (New Portuguese Letters) in whose correspondence is found a whole litany of twentieth-century generic abuses by Portuguese men to their female counterparts, and whose title suggests a continuation of the feminist social concerns awakening in the prose of 17th-century Alcoforada.
He was also fortunate to discover a relatively unknown novel (Viagens d’Altina [Altina’s Travels]) published in 1791-4, which, although published anonymously (though written by a man), was an engaging dissertation on the Equality of Women, exemplifying in prose fiction precisely what Olympe de Gouges would publish in her Rights of Women.

Kristin Matthews
Associate Professor of American Studies
Kristin_matthews@byu.edu   (801) 422-5295 | 4160 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Kristin L. Matthews' is Associate Professor of American Studies and Program Coordinator of American Studies. Her research and teaching explore postwar American literature and culture, particularly texts associated with social movements coming out of the Cold War -- the civil rights movement, women's movement, and student movements. Her publications examine the ways in which "subjectivity" is authored and read in postwar America, focusing on the ways that race and gender function in a Cold War world. She teaches American literature, African American literature, Women's Literature, and American Studies courses.

 

Nick Mason
Associate Professor of English
nick_mason@byu.edu  (801) 422-4617 | 4107 JFSB

As a specialist in British literature of the Romantic era, Nick Mason frequently teaches eighteenth- and nineteenth-century women writers. One of his most popular courses focuses on the novels of Jane Austen and how our society’s standards for canonicity and “literariness” can depend heavily on a writer’s gender. Among his women’s-studies-related publications are an anthology of Romantic-era satire that attempts to identify a tradition of women’s satire in early nineteenth-century Britain; an essay on Blackwood’s Magazine’s responses to Mary Shelley’s fiction; a book chapter on the marketing of Letitia Elizabeth Landon; and articles on Austen’s responses to her age’s obsession with shopping and its prohibitions on satire by women.

Lynne Nielsen
Associate Teaching Professor of Statistics
lynne.nielsen@byu.edu  (801) 422-9202 | 223B TMCB

Professor Lynne Nielsen has a BS in Mathematics and an MS in Statistics. She is currently working on a PhD in Instructional Psychology. Her areas of interest are statistics education, distance education, instructional design, and women's studies. Her work has lately focused on gender and international policies, analyzing data from and creating scales for WomanStats.

 

Rex P. Nielsen
Assistant Professor of Portugese and Brazilian Studies
rex_nielson@byu.edu (801) 422-2176 | 3149 JFSB

Rex P. Nielson (PhD, Brown University, 2010) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Brigham Young University. He researches a variety of issues related to Brazilian literature and film, especially in the fields of Gender Studies and Ecocriticism. He has published articles on several Brazilian women writers, including Lygia Fagundes Telles and Adriana Lisboa, and he is currently working on a book about gender roles in contemporary Brazilian literature and society. He periodically teaches WS 390R: Pan-American Women Writers, along with courses on Luso-Afro-Brazilian literature and culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He is married to Natalie Nielson, and they have five children: Henry, Lucia, Peter, Hazel, and Elias.

 

Len Novilla
Associate Professor of Public Health
len_novilla@byu.edu    (801) 422-9356 | 221B RB

Prior to joining BYU, Len served as a Senior Research Manager for the Thrasher Research Fund and was involved in managing several international and U.S.-based pediatric research grants. She has completed her medical degree at the University of the City of Manila in the Philippines and her Master of Public Health at the University of Utah. She currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Timpanogos Regional Hospital and has reviewed anti-tobacco grants for the State Health Department

Her Research interests include Maternal and child health ,defining the role of the family in promoting health , understanding health risk behaviors among adolescents, and addressing disparities in the delivery and access to health care.

 

Camille Fronk Olson
Professor and Chair of Ancient Scripture
camille_fronk@byu.edu  (801) 422-2067 | 375 JSB

Camille Fronk Olson is a professor of Ancient Scripture at BYU.  Her dissertation focused on Palestinian families in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, including gender roles and expectations for the future.  More recently, she has centered much of her research and publications on women in the Bible.  Because the cultures and traditions varied dramatically from our day and the text assumes an understanding of the ancient Near East, it is easy to misinterpret the stories and their significance for today’s world.  Dr. Olson’s work attempts to open that ancient world for the lay-person to visualize and appreciate in light of the greater biblical purpose to bear witness of the Redeemer.  She has authored Women of the Old Testament; Mary, Martha, and Me; In the Hands of the Potter; and numerous articles to analyze and explore the contributions of women in sacred texts.

 

Martha Peacock
Professor of Art History
Martha_Peacock@byu.edu   (801) 422-2149 | 3122K JKB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Martha Moffitt Peacock is professor of art history at Brigham Young University.  Her research centers on the relationship of art to the lives of women in the Dutch Republic.  Her articles “Proverbial Reframing—Rebuking and Revering Women in Trousers,” “Domesticity in the Public Sphere,” and “The Imaging and Economics of Women Consumers and Merchants in the Netherlandish Marketplace,” deal with themes of female empowerment through art.  She has also published and presented on women artists such as Geertruydt Roghman, Anna Maria van Schurman, and Joanna Koerten. Currently, she is working on her book entitled Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives:  Imaging Women of Consequence in the Dutch Golden Age.


Cecilia Peek
Associate Professor of Classics and Comparative Studies
cecilia_peek@byu.edu (801) 422-4564 | 3035 JFSB

 

Cheryl Preston
Edwin M. Thomas Professor of Law
prestonc@lawgate.byu.edu   (801) 422-2313 | 424 JRCB

Cheryl Bailey Preston, recipient of the Edwin M. Thomas Professor of Law, is a nationally recognized expert in Internet regulation and a strong advocate for children in the fight against online pornography.

Preston along with a team of law students have joined with a nonprofit organization, CP80.org Foundation, to create solutions that combine traditional legislation with Internet architecture and consumer choice. She drafts proposed legislative language and writes about online pornography issues from a constitutional, an international and a feminist theory perspective.

Professor Preston also publishes on the relationship of law and popular culture images, law and religion, and feminist legal theory. She produced an educational DVD, entitled Fashioning Women in Law. Her DVD won the prestigious Chris Award at the 2003 Columbus International Film Festival.  Professor Preston joined the BYU faculty in 1989, following ten years in private practice. She served as a law clerk to the Honorable Monroe G. McKay, United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.

Susan Sessions Rugh
Professor of History
susan_rugh@byu.edu  (801) 422-2742 | 2130 JFSB

Susan Sessions Rugh specializes in the history of travel and tourism and in the history of rural America. She earned a Ph.D. in American history from the University of Chicago in 1993, and has taught at BYU since 1997. She teaches courses in America cultural history and Women’s Studies. Her current research is about family-owned motels and immigrant entrepreneurs from Gujurat, India.

 

George Ryskamp
Associate Professor of History
george_ryskamp@byu.edu  (801) 422-8047 | 2105 JFSB

Professor George Ryskamp specializes in Hispanic and Family history.

 

Kevin Shafer
Assistant Professor of Social Work
kshafer@byu.edu 801-422-4410 |  2173 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Kevin Shaferjoined the faculty of BYU in 2011. His research generally focuses on marriage and family. His research emphasizes gender differences in remarriage and parenting. His current research addresses three main areas. First, how men and women experience stepparenting and remarriage differently. Second, he also considers differences in how men and women experience parental roles. Finally, he is interested in gender differences in mental health and help-seeking behavior.

Dr. Kevin Shafer

Jeffrey Shumway
Professor of History,Field; Argentine/Latin America
jshumway@byu.edu    (801) 422-8943 | 2143 JFSB

Professor Jeffrey Shumway  specializes in Argentina and Latin America History. His research and publications focus around marriage and family issues.

Brandie R. Siegfried
Associate Professor of British Literature
brandie_siegfried@byu.edu  (801) 422-8106 | 4036 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Brandie Siegfried teaches courses in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature. Her special interests include Shakespeare, Renaissance drama, early modern women writers, gender studies, and Irish literary history. She also has an interest in film, and often teaches an Honors course called Film Adaptations of Shakespeare.

She tends to take a cultural studies approach to literature, often providing interdisciplinary perspectives from ethnography, history, science, and art as lenses through which to read Renaissance texts.

Dr. Siegfried received her B.A. and M.A. degrees in English from Brigham Young University, an M.A. in Women's Studies from Brandeis University, and a Ph.D. in Renaissance Literature, also from Brandeis University. She joined the BYU English Department in 1993

 

 

Delys Waite Snyder
Associate Professor of English
delys.snyder@gmail.com  (801) 422-3486 | 4110B JFSB

Delys Waite Snyder, a professor in the English Department, runs the Writing Across the Curriculum program and oversees the advanced writing classes in the English Department. She uses corpus linguistics to research gender and language, in particular to trace language change in the use of non-sexist language.

Diane Louise Spangler
Associate Professor of Psychology
diane_spangler@byu.edu  (801) 422-6475 | 293 TLRB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Dr. Spangler is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology.  Her research interests include investigating the etiology and treatment of depressive, anxiety and eating disorders, and in understanding gender differences in the prevalence of these disorders.  Her work explores biological, psychological and environmental variables that may contribute to these disorders, and prevention and intervention strategies.

 

 


Anca Sprenger
Associate Professor of French Literature and Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
anca_sprenger@byu.edu     (801) 422-2306 | 3119 JFSB

Dr. Sprenger received her bachelor's degree in French Literature at the University of Bucharest and her PhD at the University of Southern California. Here at BYU she commonly teaches Introduction to French Litary Analysis, and Introduction to Romanian Literature and Culture. Her research interestes include French Literature, especially the persistence of the discourse of the sacred in modern literaty texts. She is currently working on a book about the life and work of Canadian author Gabrielle Roy.

Dr. Anca Sprenger's interests focus in French Literature, especially the persistence of the discourse of the sacred in modern literary texts. Dr. Sprenger examines the impact of secularization and loss of the "Ancien Régime" values on the 19th century French society. She analyzes the way in which sacred gestures, spiritual discourses are recuperated and encoded in modern French literature.

Charlotte A. Stanford
Associate Professor of  Interdisciplinary Humanities
charlotte_stanford@byu.edu  (801) 422-4604 | 3038 JFSB

Leslee Thorne-Murphy
Associate Professor of English Literature and Women's Studies Executive Committee Member
leslee_thorne-murphy@byu.edu (801) 422-1506 | 4034 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Leslee Thorne-Murphy is an assistant professor of English with a specialty in Victorian literature.  She teaches survey courses in British literature as well as more specialized courses in various aspects of Victorian literature and women’s studies.

Her research interests include women’s literature, book history, and scholarly editing. Presently she is working on two book-length projects.  The first is an edited volume of diaries written by Rhoda Ann Burgess, an LDS pioneer who settled in southern Utah.  The diaries give invaluable insight into the daily life of a common woman on the frontier.

Her second project is a monograph exploring print culture at Victorian fundraising bazaars.  Almost entirely organized, supplied, and staffed by women, these bazaars contributed to the massive philanthropic efforts common to the Victorian period and became a vital component in women’s cultural experience.

Jacqueline Thursby
Professor of Amerian Literature and Folklore
jackie_thursby@byu.edu     (801) 422-3747 | 4163 JFSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

I studied gender and women's studies in my graduate programs, and taught Cultural Plurality which included gender and women's studies at Bowling Green. I have just finished writing a major book on the American writer, Maya Angelou. I have taught "Women's Culture, Women's Folklore" both at the undergraduate and graduate level at BYU for several years, and I recently taught a graduate class in 19th Century Women's Culture, Women's Folklore here. I am currently involved in charity work in India regarding free-education for children to aid impoverished mother's in educating their children.

Evan R. Ward
Associate Professor of History
evan_ward@byu.edu    (801) 422-8506 | 2115 JFSB

Dr. Evan R. Ward is associate professor of history in the department of history at Brigham Young University. He received a BA in history from Brigham Young University (1995) and an MA (1997) and PhD (2000), both in history, from the University of Georgia. Dr. Ward is a scholar of (1) tourism development in Latin America and (2) global travel and intellectual development. He is currently writing a book manuscript on the role of travel in intellectual development during the twentieth century. The project, subsequently entitled, “Foxes [a reference to broad, rather than narrow, learners] Will Roam: Curiosity and Mobility in the Twentieth Century,” looks at the experiences of male and female travelers as companions in pursuit of knowledge. He has completed archival work on female travelers at Oxford University, Cambridge University, Smith College, and the Rockefeller Archives. His work at Cambridge was supported by a grant from the College of General Studies (2011). His research at the Rockefeller Archives was supported by an external grant from the Rockefeller Archive Center (2010).

Paul Westover
Assistant Professor of English
paw@byu.edu (801) 422-3048 4149 JFSB

Gender Studies Related Publications


Paul Westover joined the BYU faculty in 2008. He specializes in British Romantic-era literature and cultural history, and he regularly teaches works by women writers of the early nineteenth century. He has special interests in women’s poetry, travel writing, and “homes and haunts.” His first book, Necromanticism, is a study of literary tourism and ritual relations with the literary dead.

Mary Jane Woodger
Associate Professor of Church History
maryjane_woodger@byu.edu   (801) 422-9029 | 275E JSB
Gender Studies Related Publications

Mary Jane Woodger, Ed.D., is a professor of Church history and doctrine at Brigham Young University. Born and raised in American Fork and Salt Lake City, Utah, Mary Jane has always had a great love for teaching. After obtaining a bachelor’s degree in home economics education, she taught home economics and American history in Salt Lake City. In 1992, she completed her master of education degree at Utah State University, and in 1997, she received from Brigham Young University a doctor of education degree in educational leadership, with a minor in Church history and doctrine. She was honored by Kappa Omicron Nu with the Award of Excellence for her dissertation research, entitled The Educational Ideals of David O. McKay. Since then, Dr. Woodger has written and published several books including three books about the life and teachings of David O. McKay, as well as a book on the timely subject of self-esteem. She has also authored numerous articles on doctrinal, historical, and educational subjects. These articles have appeared in various academic journals, as well as the Journal of Book of Mormon Studies, the Church News, the Ensign, and The Religious Educator. Recently, Dr. Woodger received the Best Article of the Year Award from the Utah Historical Society, as well as the Brigham Young University Faculty Women’s Association Teaching Award. Dr. Woodger’s current research interests include twentieth-century Church history, Latter-day Saint women’s history, and Church education. Her research always includes women’s connections in Church history.

Niwako Yamawaki
Associate Professor of Psychology
Niwako_yamawaki@byu.edu (801) 422-8053 | 1094 SWKT
Gender Studies Related Publications

Niwako Yamawaki is an associate professor of the Department of Psychology at Brigham Young University where she teaches in the area of applied social psychology and the psychology of gender. Her research focuses on investigating how sexism and gender roles influence the perception of violence against women. She also conducts such studies in a cross-cultural setting by examining the roles of cultural factors to understand these world-wide social concerns.