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Winter 2012:

Women's Studies WS 222: Introduction to Women's Studies WS 390R: Mormon Women's History WS 392 R: Colloquium
ANTHROPOLOGY ANTHR 431: Kinship and Gender    
ENGLISH ENGL 396: Studies in Women’s Literature    
PSYCHOLOGY PSYCH 306: Psychology of Gender    
SOCIOLOGY SOC 323: Racial and Minority-Group Relations SOC 323: Racial and Minority-Group Relations  
School of Family Life SFL 461: The Family and the Law SFL 471: Philosophies of Family Work and Relationships  
HISTORY HIST 318: European Women’s History HIST 358: Gender and History in Latin America HIST 378: American Family History
HEALTH HLTH 450: Women’s Health Issues    

WS 222—Introduction to Women’s Studies, Section 1—Leslee Thorne-Murphy
12:00-1:15 TTh / B152 JFSB

In this section of Introduction to Women’s Studies we will participate in an interdisciplinary discussion of women’s issues by reading selections from a variety of scholars, activists, and community leaders.  We will study gender as it affects the law, social policy, family dynamics, culture, healthcare, and spiritual life.  During the semester, we will have a chance to put the information learned in class into practice through a community service learning project.

WS 222—Introduction to Women’s Studies, Section 2—Renata Forste
9:30-10:45 TTh / B032 JFSB

Introduction to Women’s Studies: This course will examine how the experience of women is embedded within our culture and institutions such as the family, religion, education, law, and the economy, with particular emphasis on how these experiences differ from those of men. This course is an introduction to many of the most important issues that affect women's lives and will include historical, sociological, psychological, theological, legal, literary, and multicultural approaches that inform our understanding of women's experience.  My background is in sociology – thus the course will particularly emphasize the social construction of gender in contemporary society. We will look at the gendered meanings of experiences, events, ideas, and social institutions for women.

WS 390R: Mormon Women’s History, Section 1—Rachel Cope
12:00-1:30 MW / W011 BNSN

Throughout the semester, a number of interesting themes will be explored in which Mormon women will be placed within their various contexts: religious history, women's history, and Mormon history in general. Topics will include: historical agency (what does that even mean for a woman?), conversion narratives (how does Lucy Mack Smith compare to her Protestant contemporaries who also wrote memoirs?), hymnody as history and theology (how might understanding that make D&C 25 more meaningful? And did Protestant women compile hymn books?), print culture (what were women reading and writing, and how did that influence them?), reform movements (how does Relief Society fit into that context?), polygamy (so much to say—just trust me on this one!), anti-Mormonism and anti-Catholicism in nineteenth-century America (why was anti-religious literature so prone to sexualize and demean women?), women as missionaries  (how do they fit into the larger context?),suffrage (Mormon women were political?) race (we will talk about 1978 — and consider the experiences of the first black woman to serve a mission), ERA (what was that all about?) and on and on and on. If you are interested in learning more about your roots, and discussing an array of subjects with academic rigor in a context of faith, this may be just the class for you!

WS 392R: Women’s Studies Colloquium, Section 1—Valerie Hegstrom
11:00-11:50 F / B104 JFSB

The Women's Studies Colloquium is a scholarly forum for discussion, intellectual development, and scholarly collaboration among students, faculty, and others interested in participating in a community of Women's Studies scholars. It is a great opportunity for students to share ideas with other students and to interact with Women's Studies faculty. Colloquium lectures present scholarly findings on topics relating to women's lives and experiences throughout history, across the world, and within ethnic, educational, and economic segments of society. Students gain experience interviewing and introducing lecturers, discussing new ideas in Q&A sessions, and responding verbally and in writing to colloquium presentations. The Winter Semester 2012 Colloquium will include speakers from Missouri, North Carolina, and Senegal. Please join us!.

ANTHR 431: Kinship and Gender, Section 1—John P. Hawkins
9:30-10:45 TTH / 374 MARB

Kinship theory and analysis, 1920-present. Recent issues in anthropological treatment of gender, marriage, and family structure.

ENGL 396: Studies in Women’s Literature, Section 1—M. Suzanne Lundquist
11:00-11:50 MWF / B150 JFSB

Women’s Literature, English 396, will explore award-winning American Women authors---including:  Willa Cather (Pulitzer), Patricia MacLachlan (Newberry), Ursula K. Le Guin (Hugo and Nebula), Marilynne Robinson (Pulitzer), Annie Dillard (Pulitzer), and Alice Walker (Pulitzer) among others.  We will begin with the immigrant experience and explore women’s voices both mainstream and multicultural.  Films (documentaries included) will also be viewed and discussed, including Iron Jawed Angels, the story of Alice Paul and Lucy Burns and the fight for women’s suffrage.

HIST 318: European Women’s History, Section 1—Amy Harris
11:00-11:50 MWF / 348 MARB

History 318 (European Women’s History) is designed to provide the student with a general knowledge of European women’s lives since 1400 and the historiography of women’s and gender history and the historical development of feminism. The class takes seriously the aim of a BYU education to offer students the opportunity to become “prayerful thinkers”.  To this end, students will engage in several genres of writing. While writing is not necessary to prayer, it is essential to developing habits of thinking.  Writing in history classes provides an excellent opportunity to practice becoming not just better historians and better writers, but better thinkers.  The connection between thinking (and its written manifestations) and prayer is not accidental – the scriptures teach us that pondering (thinking), recording (writing) and conversation (prayer) are powerful learning tools. This class also provides students opportunities to conduct research in secondary and primary sources and to think analytically about the experiences of women and men in the past.
 

HIST 358: Gender and History in Latin America, Section 1—Jeffrey Shumway
1:35-2:50 TTH / 241 MSRB

History 358:  Gender and Family in Latin America:  This course will examine how gender and gender roles influenced history, and vice versa, in Latin America from the colonial times to the present. All cultures have ideal norms of how society should be ordered. Human agency many times shapes those ideals, alters them, and violates them. So we might also say that this course will seek to understand how human agency (human choices) have influenced the gender roles of men, women, parents, children, as well as the role of the Nation State, which many times saw itself as the head of a national family. The objectives of this course are twofold: to develop useful knowledge as well as useful skills. Among our major knowledge objectives will be to answer some important questions regarding gender in Latin American history. How did Old World gender roles and norms get transferred to the New World, and how did Spanish colonial policy shape gender roles and family life there?  What were the legacies for gender relations of three centuries of Spanish colonialism and encounters between various cultures? What was the impact of independence from Spain on family life? How did the new nation states shape gender norms? How did the free-trade economies affect men and women and families? What is "machismo" and to what extent does it influence various cultures in the region?  How can looking at gender relations help us understand 20thcentury revolutions and dictatorships? These are some of the major themes we will be covering, although we will not be able to exhaust every example in every country


HIST 378: American Family History, Section 1—Mary Richards
1:00-1:50 MWF / 154 HRCB

History of American families from colonial period to the present.

HLTH 450: Women’s Health Issues, Section 1—Karen Shores
4:00-6:30 M /120 TNRB

Overview of selected health topics affecting women's health status. Primary emphasis on steps to enhance personal health and fulfill divine roles from childhood through adulthood.


PSYCH 306: Psychology of Gender, Section 1-- Niwako Yamawaki
12:05-1:20 TTH / 253 MARB

This course introduces students to psychological research on the experiences, behaviors, and abilities of men and women. We will study attitudes about gender, theories of gender development, and research about similarities and differences between men and women. Topics we will study include sex differences and similarities in mental abilities, personality, social behavior, and relationships.  We will also study mental health issues and experiences of men and women in the workplace, as well as look at the most current research documenting advances in gender equity and other gender related issues that continue to need attention.

PSYCH 306: Psychology of Gender, Section 2—Sally Barlow
1:35-2:50 TTH / 231 MARB
This course introduces students to psychological research on the experiences, behaviors, and abilities of men and women. We will study attitudes about gender, theories of gender development, and research about similarities and differences between men and women. Topics we will study include sex differences and similarities in mental abilities, personality, social behavior, and relationships.  We will also study mental health issues and experiences of men and women in the workplace, as well as look at the most current research documenting advances in gender equity and other gender related issues that continue to need attention.

PSYCH 306: Psychology of Gender, Section 3—Staff
4:30-7:00 M / 3716 HBLL

This course introduces students to psychological research on the experiences, behaviors, and abilities of men and women. We will study attitudes about gender, theories of gender development, and research about similarities and differences between men and women. Topics we will study include sex differences and similarities in mental abilities, personality, social behavior, and relationships.  We will also study mental health issues and experiences of men and women in the workplace, as well as look at the most current research documenting advances in gender equity and other gender related issues that continue to need attention.

SFL 461: The Family and the Law, Section 1—Camille Buhman
12:00-1:20 TTh / B062 JFSB

Legal environment of the familysystem, with emphasis on husband-wife and parent-child relationships, rights, and responsibilities.

SFL 471: Philospohies of Family Work and Relationships, Section 1—Jenet Erickson
12:10-1:25 TTh/ 1020 JKB

Changes in household labor across time, current issues around gender and household labor, and philosophical perspectives of family work and family relationships.

SOC 323: Racial and Minority-Group Relations, Section 1—Howard Bahr
1:00-1:50 MWF / B032 JFSB

Sociology 323 (Race and Ethnicity) focuses on ethnic divisions in human society, with special reference to their history, structure, and consequences. Among other things, we explore some of the vocabulary and conceptual frameworks that have informed the study of ethnic relations in the social sciences. Our geohistorical scope emphasizes but is not limited to ethnic relations in North America in the past century, along with such earlier history as seems relevant. One of our texts explicitly aims for a world perspective, and another draws primarily on mid-20th-century European history. This is explicitly a multidisciplinary course in which we immerse ourselves in several viewpoints—our authors include a sociologist, an anthropologist, two essayists on race in America who might be considered “American Studies” or literary figures, and a journalist.


SOC 367: Sociology of Gender, Section 1—Catherine Jeppsen
12:00-12:50 MWF / B032 JFSB

Through course readings, lectures, and student participation, this Sociology of Gender course will provide an overview of ways in which gender is considered within the discipline of sociology. Specifically, course participants will explore the answers to four main questions: First, what is gender? Second, what are the main theoretical perspectives within the sociology of gender? Third, how arethese perspectives related to the questions we ask about gender? Fourth, what do we do with thisinformation?

 

Fall 2011

 

Women’s Studies Colloquium, WS 392R

Scholarly findings presented by researchers on topics relating to women's lives and experiences throughout history,  across the world, and within ethnic, educational, and economic segments of society.

12:00p-12:50 TH  Valerie Hegstrom

 

*Women and Representation, WS 390R

New Course! Women, and their involvement and representation in Politics.

3:00p-4:15 MW Raymond Christensen and Jessica Preece

 

Studies in Women’s Literature, ENGL 396

Female-authored literary texts and literary theory concerning women.

11:00-11:50 MWF  Kristin L. Matthews

 

US Women’s History, HIST 384

Survey course of women's experience in American culture and society from the Puritans to the present.

12:00-12:50 MWF  Rebecca DeSchweinitz

 

Psychology of Gender, PSYCH 306

Biological and social contributions to sex role development, sexual self-concept, and complementarity of sex roles.

5-7:30 Th  Emily Putman

 

Philosophies of Family work and relationships, SFL 471

Changes in household labor across time, current issues around gender and household labor,  and philosophical perspectives of family work and family relationships.

12:10-1:35 TTh  Erin Holmes

 

Racial and Minority Group Relations, Soc 323

Social psychological and social structural analysis of racial and ethnic relations;  Prejudice, discrimination, responses, protests, current issues.

9:30-10:45 TTh  Howard Bahr